The ABCDs of Skin Cancer

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    "A" stands for asymmetry. Growths with irregular shapes, such as two very different-looking halves, should be checked out by a doctor.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    "B" stands for border irregularity. Moles with irregular, notched or scalloped borders are cause for concern, as these are all characteristics of melanoma.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    "C" stands for color variety. Look for growths that have many colors or an uneven distribution of color.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    "D" stands for diameter greater than 5 millimeters. "We all have beauty marks, but if it becomes large, you should be concerned," says Dr. Jody A. Levine, a dermatologist from Plastic Surgery & Dermatology of NYC.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer, with an estimated 1 million new cases each year in the U.S.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Basal cell carcinoma can look like a red, scaly growth on the skin, or similar to a pimple. It could bleed or look like a cut that isn’t going away.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Any mark on the skin that cannot be attributed to a specific cause should be looked at, Levine says.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer, with over 250,000 new cases per year estimated in the United States.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Most cases of squamous cell carcinoma are caused by chronic overexposure to the sun.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology
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    Squamous cell carcinoma can metastasize if it starts on a mucous membrane such as the lips or eyes.

    Courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology

 

 

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