Jack the Ripper on Display

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    1: Charles Booth’s Master Map of Poverty, showing part of East London, 1887-1889. Levels of poverty are recorded using a seven-point color code. At the bottom of the scale (black) were the "semi-criminal" elements. Above them were those who were "in chronic want" (dark blue) and the "poor" (light blue). At the top of the scale were the "well-to-do" (red) and the "wealthy" (yellow).

    Museum in Docklands
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    Poor boys on London’s East End, c. 1900.

    Museum in Docklands
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    An East End family, c. 1900.

    Museum in Docklands
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    Poor boys on London’s East End, c. 1900.

    Museum in Docklands
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    A poverty-stricken East End family, c. 1900.

    Museum in Docklands
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    A police report on finding the body of Mary Ann Nichols, August 31, 1888.

    The National Archives
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    The weekly Illustrated Police News served up dramatic and salacious sketches of crime scenes, victims and villains on every front page. The Whitechapel murders figured heavily.

    Museum in Docklands
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    The weekly Illustrated Police News served up dramatic and salacious sketches of crime scenes, victims and villains on every front page. The Whitechapel murders figured heavily.

    Museum in Docklands
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    A crowd gathers round the windows of a shop to read the Illustrated Police News.

    Museum in Docklands
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    The "Dear Boss" letter, from September 25, 1888. On September 29, a Central News Agency journalist, Tom Bulling, forwarded a letter to the Metropolitan Police which he said had been received by the agency two days earlier. At first it had been "treated as a joke." The letter claimed to be from the killer and was signed "Yours truly, Jack the Ripper." Its prediction of events to come was particularly chilling.

    The National Archives
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    The "Dear Boss" letter and envelope, from September 25, 1888. On September 29, a Central News Agency journalist, Tom Bulling, forwarded a letter to the Metropolitan Police which he said had been received by the agency two days earlier. At first it had been "treated as a joke." The letter claimed to be from the killer and was signed "Yours truly, Jack the Ripper." Its prediction of events to come was particularly chilling.

    The National Archives
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    This amputation knife is said to have been used by Jack the Ripper. An iconic part of the myth surrounding Jack the Ripper, the knife came from a gunsmith who worked with Scotland Yard, in a box lined with blood-stained silk. Its previous owner used it for pruning shrubs.

    Donald Rumbelow
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    A promotion for the exhibit at the Museum in Docklands.

    Museum in Docklands
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    Detail from the Illustrated Police News.

    Museum in Docklands
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    May 14, 2008: A member of staff poses stands in front of a screen showing a short movie about Jack the Ripper during a press preview for the exhibition "Jack the Ripper and the East End" at the Museum in Docklands, London.

    AP

 

 

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