“I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic party for President of the United States,” Bernie Sanders called out yesterday afternoon to end the roll call vote to electric cheers.

The magnitude of the moment cannot be understated.

In our 240-year history we had yet to see a woman head a major party ticket – until Tuesday.

Whether you love Hillary or hate her – and there are certainly many on both sides of that equation – history was made on Tuesday night. To not take a moment and reflect on the scale of her achievement does the former secretary of state a disservice as well as the story of our great nation.

We all know that November is a long time away and the race is very tight. But I would encourage everyone to take a break from the who’s up and who’s down politics talk for a moment and reflect on what Hillary has done.

What Clinton has achieved goes above and beyond partisanship, which all too often bogs our politics down in battles of pettiness and spite. Indeed, we saw this at play even on Tuesday night when many all but forgot to acknowledge what Clinton has managed to accomplish by virtue of just winning the nomination.

We can debate the merits of her policies, her record and her trustworthiness, but the sheer excitement we should feel as a country that we have finally seen a woman put a big ole crack in the highest glass ceiling isn’t up for debate.

Clinton herself certainly took in the moment. In a video address to close out the evening, she said "This is really your victory. This is really your night. And if there are any little girls out there who stayed up late to watch, let me just say I may become the first woman President. But one of you is next."

For the first time in American history, we can say with surety that politics at the highest level will be open to the next generation of little girls. This is a theme the Democrats have been emphasizing throughout the convention and will continue to as the week goes on. For instance, to hear Michelle Obama talk about the guidance and inspiration her two girls can take from Hillary’s candidacy and success in clinching the nomination is meaningful.

Furthermore, the speakers have managed to avoid advocating for Hillary on the basis of her gender, which would be a dangerous game to play in this election where Trump continues to defy all odds. That said, the Democrats’ approach appears to have paid off thus far: seven in ten younger women back Clinton and she currently has the largest gender gap advantage over Trump ever recorded which stands at 20 points as of this month.  

We all know that November is a long time away and the race is very tight. But I would encourage everyone to take a break from the who’s up and who’s down politics talk for a moment and reflect on what Hillary has done.

Congratulations, Hillary Clinton. This is one glass ceiling I’m thrilled to see shattered into pieces. 

Jessica Tarlov, Ph.D., is a political strategist at Douglas E. Schoen, LLC. Follow her on Twitter @JessicaTarlov.