One of those days, one of those weeks. The world changes and you feel sick as you watch it go a bit more over the edge. Then you eat and you laugh and you work, but it comes back. The barometer has tilted a bit more toward “stormy,” and there’s nothing you can do to wrench it back.

I watched the video of the café again today. It’s grainy and black and white, but it puts you there when the horror begins. It’s Friday night in Paris and people are outside, drinking, enjoying friends.

But then there’s a gunman in the street. And then he’s closer, by the window. He’s reloading, but something is stuck. And then he’s gone. We can’t see the people anymore, because they’re on the ground. Then a woman gets up and runs, and then another does the same. They played dead among the dead, and then they got up and ran for their lives. 

 

What sort of hate can move a 27-year-old to massacre? What brand of faith says the rest have to go? The ringleader, now dead too, said he moved freely between Belgium and Syria because Allah was watching over him and blinding the infidel agents who were looking for him.

There is a gaping chasm, and it will require a Herculean effort to close it. Who will provide it so loud that all can hear? Who will have the strength to stop the killing?

FOX reporter Benjamin Hall interviewed young men in Mollenbeek, Belgium, who said they could understand the anger. They said Europe had never been accepting of them. Fans at a soccer match in Turkey booed during a moment of silence for those killed in Paris. They weren’t sad for the twentysomethings who died. They weren’t interested in a moment of silence. They booed.

 

The other night, Stephen Colbert and Bill Maher, the Catholic and the atheist, went at it over religion. Stephen urged Bill, who was raised Catholic, to “come on back” to the faith. Bill got a bit testy and said he was being lectured to. He said there were things in the world beyond his understanding, but he didn’t have to fill in the gap with "silly stories.” Stephen said his religion gave him the strength to take such jabs with humility. They may have been momentarily peeved, but they chuckled and shook hands.

As President Obama said on a different topic this week, “That’s who we are. It’s what we do.” Colbert and Maher have different beliefs, but they can live with that.

But 130 people in Paris can’t. Neither can 43 in Beirut, nor 224 on a Russian plane. They have to go down.

There is a gaping chasm, and it will require a Herculean effort to close it. Who will provide it so loud that all can hear? Who will have the strength to stop the killing?

The world needs a strong new narrative, or perhaps just an old silly story:

An arc. A welcome for a wayward son. A healer who will give up his life for a friend.

You fill in the gap.

Martha MacCallum currently serves as the co-anchor of "America's Newsroom" alongside Bill Hemmer (Weekdays 9-11AM/ET). She joined FOX News Channel (FNC) in January 2004. Click here for more information on Martha MacCallum