"Against all odds, against all odds, we achieved this huge victory for Likud. We achieved the huge victory for our people. And I am proud, I am proud for the people of Israel, that in the moment of truth, knew to make the right decision and to choose the real material things over immaterial things," newly reelected Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told supporters Tuesday night.

And he’s right. Polling on the eve of the election suggested that Netanyahu’s Likud was trailing the Zionist Union by three seats at 22 to 25. The final count gave Likud 30 seats to the Zionist’s 24.

For there to be peace in the region, President Obama needs to bow to reality and not deal with the Iranians – and by extension the Syrians – but with the coalitions of the Israelis, Egyptians, Saudis and UAE countries.

This is a tremendous turn around that not only gives Netanyahu the mandate to continue to govern as he has, but it is also a clear and obvious rebuke to President Obama.

For there to be peace in the region, President Obama needs to bow to reality and not deal with the Iranians – and by extension the Syrians – but with the coalitions of the Israelis, Egyptians, Saudis and UAE countries.

Indeed, Netanyahu came to the United State just two weeks ago against the will of the Obama administration. He knew what he was doing. It was more important to make his case on the controversial Iranian nuclear deal than to win friends in the White House.

This turned out to be an especially astute move considering that there was little to no chance that Netanyahu could or would win friends in the White House: President Obama had Democrat operatives working for Netanyahu’s opponent in Israel. And Obama has made it clear over his tenure how little his relationship with Netanyahu means to him, putting less effort into the maintenance of the US-Israeli alliance than his predecessors.

But Netanyahu’s win isn’t just a rebuke to Obama, it also undermines the Europeans who placed a disproportionate emphasis on the importance of establishing a Palestinian state.

As for the Iran nuclear deal, which is in the final stages of negotiations, Netanyahu’s victory represents a huge point of concern for the future of the deal. Given his position, it’s hard to believe that he will sit silently especially considering his mandate. We should expect to hear more from Netanyahu on the deal in the coming days.

Further, Netanyahu’s win indicates that his final campaign assertion that he would not accept a Palestinian state could well have made the difference for him. As I wrote above, he was polling behind the Zionist Union up until the polls opened. Nothing changed but his rejection of a two state solution, a position that Western leaders have supported.

All of this is bad news for the Iran nuclear deal and bad news for efforts to resolve the Israeli/Palestinian conflict on terms that the U.S. has wanted. It also raises the specter of the potential for conflict should the nuclear deal go forward with the Iranians.

Most of all it means that for there to be peace in the region, President Obama needs to bow to reality and not deal with the Iranians – and by extension the Syrians – but with the coalitions of the Israelis, Egyptians, Saudis and UAE countries.

The next few days will be telling, but make no mistake about it, this is a central rebuff to Barack Obama, his policies and approach.