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Mayim Bialik: It’s hard to stay focused with Israel on my mind

mayim bialik israel.jpg

 (Reuters)

Besides the fact that I am recovering from major hand surgery, I am finding it difficult to write these days. I am using a dictation program, as well as utilizing Fancy Assistant Brandon’s typing skills, so it’s not that I have no way to communicate with the outside world.

The problem is with Israel. It’s on my mind pretty much all of the time. When the three teenagers were kidnapped a month ago, it was on my mind. When they were found murdered and left in an open field, it was on my mind. When Jewish extremists burned a Palestinian teenager alive in retribution, it was on my mind.

What is also on my mind is the plight of the Palestinian people; the innocent people caught in the crossfire of Hamas, a military and political entity which calls for the explicit destruction of the state of Israel as part of their official charter. What is also on my mind are the hundreds of thousands of Jews and Arabs in Israel being shelled with rockets from every border. What is also on my mind is my family and my friends and their children and their grandchildren being ushered into bomb shelters when sirens blare.

What is on my mind is the very real war in Gaza and Israel and also the public relations war that is raging in the Middle East. Israel is losing this war because of bureaucracy and fear and denial. I wish all of the Israel haters would learn more about Israel. And I wish all of the Arab haters would stop hating in the name of religion.

I wish no one cared what celebrities think about the situation in Israel. I wish people would stop posting things on social media about what a horrible person I am because I am a Jew. And about how all Israel supporters are Nazis and hate Palestinian children and want them dead. Because that’s just wrong and ridiculous.

Click here to continue reading Mayim Bialik's piece on Kveller.com.

Mayim Hoya Bialik is best known for her lead role as Blossom Russo in the early-1990s NBC television sitcom “Blossom” and now appears regularly on the #1 comedy in America, CBS’ “The Big Bang Theory” playing neurobiologist Amy Farrah Fowler, a role for which she has received one Screen Actors Guild nomination and two Emmy nominations. Bialik earned a BS from UCLA in 2000 in Neuroscience and Hebrew & Jewish Studies, and went on to the Ph.D. program in Neuroscience, also at UCLA.