Reality TV has penetrated all manner of news lately. It appears that those who would seek a short cut to fame and fortune need only find a way to crash a state dinner at the White House; pretend your child’s life is in peril on a run away helium balloon or have an inordinate amount of kids through in vitro fertilization. I suggest that there are 10 reasons that reality TV should be held accountable:

1.It reduces human emotions to ratings.

2.It appeals to our lowest instincts.

3.It sets up a dangerous reward system.

4.It takes advantage of people’s desperation.

5.It promotes notoriety without responsibility.

6.It gives place to those who seek unmerited honor.

7.It contributes to the delinquency of our national conscience.

9.It glamorizes dysfunction.

10.It pads the pockets of those who place monetary gain over values.

What constitutes reality? Are these programs snapshots of the American experience or are they the offerings of producers bent on further pushing the envelope? Whereas those who willingly participate in such programs are placing themselves in a position to be exploited, there is a larger responsibility that rests with those who provide an atmosphere for such exploitation and who profit from the misfortune of others.

Although not all reality TV is devoid of values, such programming often succumbs to the need to shock and awe viewers for the sake of ratings. As long as there is an appetite for such programming on the part of the general public, there will be an ample supply. People will seek the rewards that come with breeching White House security and worse.