Al Franken has assumed many titles over the years: comedian, failed radio show host, liberal activist, tax cheat (a requirement these days to be elected into Democratic office). Now he can add senator to that list. Yes, America, it's official. The left seeks to drastically alter every aspect of our life and now they have the support of a clown to help them succeed (GOP: we've officially hit the bottom).

It couldn't have happened at a worse time.

Democrats are poised to usher in a new era of nanny state governance through pivotal and preposterous pieces of legislation at warp speed. So fast, in fact, that nobody on Capitol Hill has had time to read these bills, tell us the details or give us the mounting price tag. Franken's victory puts the Democratic Party at that much feared 60 vote filibuster proof majority, even though Senators Kennedy and Byrd are on indefinite medical leave and are only likely to return for the most crucial votes. He could provide the key vote on the largest tax increase in history, the most radical overhaul of our health care system and the way we structure our financial markets.

It doesn't stop there. Also on the Senate's agenda are ratifying judicial nominees, immigration, and the pet project of organized labor: the Employee Free Choice Act, a bill that would give workers more power to form unions. (As if they don't have enough power already).

Some on the left are downplaying the difference he'll make, including Franken himself.

"I'm not going to Washington to be the 60th Democratic senator, I'm going to Washington to be the second senator from Minnesota," he insisted.

Franken is a lot of things. A pragmatic, moderate maverick with an independent streak is not one of them. He is as far-left as they come, a unique strain of irrational progressive that can only be created by the world of celebrity, a la Jeanine Garafalo. The party infrastructure has spent millions of dollars and countless months working tirelessly to assure his election to office. He owes them. Big. And there is no question they can count on their newest member to repay the favors.

Democrats might, as Time magazine put it: "have added a famous face with a high TV-recognizability factor to help with fundraising -- and brought someone with a decent sense of humor to the world's most deliberative body."

The jury is still out on his sense of humor. But as far as his impact, the ruling is confirmed. No one's laughing.

Andrea Tantaros is a conservative commentator and columnist. Her commentary can be found at www.andreatantaros.com.