• With: Neil Cavuto

    Here's how tough it is to ever get a handle on entitlement spending.

    A fictional character on a fictional TV show fictionally toys with the idea, and viewers go seriously nuts.

    Spoiler alert, I'm talking about an episode in the latest season of "House of Cards" on Netflix.

    Without giving away too much, let's just say President Frank Underwood is proposing sweeping cuts to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid and plans using the half trillion bucks he'll save to create 10 million jobs though he doesn't detail exactly how.

    Just that the notoriously duplicitous and evil President Underwood will tell Americans that they're "entitled to nothing," so he's pretty much cutting everything.

    Left-wing blogs are going nuts.

    The Huffington Post detailing how Underwood's goal of zero unemployment is impossible.

    And that even if he did get there inflation would get out of control everywhere.

    I must stress this is a fictional show about a fictional president proposing a fictional concept

    And I know it's a fictional concept because it's about getting spending under control in Washington.

    As if!

    But that doesn't stop Huffington contributor Richard Eskow from getting really riled.

    The senior fellow at something called, "Campaign for America's Future," takes fictional President Underwood's "America Works" program to task.

    Quoting here, "the greatest deceptions on 'House of Cards' can be found in the misleading arguments, presented as ‘truth,' which suggest that cutting ‘entitlements' is a necessity and raising taxes isn't even an option. "

    Richard you're a great write, but it's a TV show. It's not real. And Underwood? He's not really president.

    No matter, Eskow finds curious or is it just coincidental that Netflix has insisted upon heavy tax breaks for filming the show in Maryland.

    Damn that President Underwood! And his damning cuts. And his throwing millions of seniors into poverty and desperation!

    Damn him all to hell!

    Fiction, my foot! I think Richard's onto something.

    Or maybe just on something.

    Because last time I checked.

    This is just something a fake character is discussing on a fake show that not even on that fake show has a serious chance of passing.

    After all, it's called ‘House of Cards' for a reason, it's fiction.

    Not at all to be confused with our financial house of cards.

    Which is real. Very real.