• With: Rick Santorum

    This is a rush transcript from "Your World," September 25, 2014. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    NEIL CAVUTO, ANCHOR: Rick Santorum joining us right now, former Republican senator and presidential candidate. So, he is out. What will his legacy be, Senator? What do you think?

    FORMER SEN. RICK SANTORUM, R-PA.: Well, I think he ticked through his legacy.

    I mean, he is someone who -- who went into the office, as he described President Obama, with a great deal of idealism, with a -- an agenda. I find that sort of hard to believe that an attorney general should come into the office of being the chief law enforcement man to come in with a political agenda.

    But it's very, very clear from his own statement, he's very proud of that. He's very proud of the fact that he went out and advanced certain causes that believed were -- quote -- "just."

    That's, in my mind, not the role of the attorney general. The role of the attorney general is to be just that, someone who is to oversee the laws, to execute those laws, to faithfully defend the laws. He mentioned -- President Obama mentioned the Defense of Marriage Act, which he's been vindicated.

    Well, at the time, it was the law of the land, and he had an obligation to defend it, but he refused to do so. Why? Because he had -- his own personal opinions were, in his mind, supreme to his duty to follow his dictates of his office.

    That's, I think, going to be his legacy, that he's in many respects transformed that office into a much more political office than it ever has been.

    CAVUTO: Well, on the left and the right, both sides agree that he has certainly been consequential. Republicans like yourself certainly don't flip over the consequences of that stewardship, but that's neither here nor there.

    I guess the question now is his successor and this rush of the clock here to find someone while the Democrat Senate still exists. The growing fears among Democrats, as you know, that might not be the case next year.

    What do you think?

    SANTORUM: Well, no matter what happens, the Democrats are going to control the Senate in the lame-duck session and have the rule in place that confirmations can be approved by the Senate with 51 votes.

    So, I don't...

    CAVUTO: We should stress that if Republicans take over, it reverts back to a vote of 60 to do that, right?

    SANTORUM: It could.

    CAVUTO: It could.

    SANTORUM: Certainly, the Republicans may say, hey, what's good for the goose is good for the gander, and -- but probably not, given the fact that the president is a Democrat.

    So you're right. They're more likely to revert back to 60 votes to make the hurdle higher for the president right now. But I don't -- I would be surprised if the president waits too long. There's certainly a lot of internal machinations they are going to go through.

    But I suspect, by November, when the lame duck comes back, they will have a nominee and they probably would able to get that nominee through.

    CAVUTO: I'm wondering whether that nominee would have to clean up a lot of the messes that you alluded to. And the Democrats don't call them messes, but investigations that never went anywhere, whether it was the Justice Department screening out reporters that were considered hostile to it.

    James Rosen -- our James Rosen experienced that -- or whether it just sort of ignored what was going on at other agencies, including the IRS, whether that person coming in will have to look into these things or just move on, dismiss these things. What do you think?

    SANTORUM: I suspect that the president will put in someone who will continue to do what Eric -- look, Eric Holder wasn't a lone wolf on this. He wasn't someone who was acting -- you heard the closeness of the relationship, the longevity between the two of them.

    He was an early supporter of the president. He shared the president's vision for this office. He executed the office exactly the way the president wanted to. I think that's one of the reasons you see the obvious sincerity of the heartfelt sentiments that the president had in Holder leaving.

    So, I think you're going to see very much the same. Whoever it is, is going to have the same marching orders. And I suspect you will find someone who is rather close to the president, someone who is a good confidant that will continue this -- this same type of behavior.

    CAVUTO: Senator Rick Santorum, good seeing you again, sir. Thank you very much.

    SANTORUM: My pleasure.

    Content and Programming Copyright 2014 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2014 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.