• With: Neil Cavuto

    By now you know the naked truth.

    Uploading naked pictures of yourself come back to bite.

    Even years after the fact.

    Once uploaded to a cloud, don't think someday they're not gonna come raining back down.

    Just ask Rihanna or Kate Upton or Jennifer Lawrence.

    They thought their stuff was safe up there.

    It wasn't. Someone got it. And shared it.

    And some of these divas understandably want to sue over it.

    I'm not here to judge whether these beauties have a right to feel so beastly.

    Just state the obvious and call it World Wide Web reality.

    Sun Microsystems founder Scott McNealy famously once said that if you want your privacy in this brave new technology world, get over it.

    Because it ain't happening.

    Especially when you store anything on the web.

    Even under lock and key. And super password protection.

    It seems every time they build a better mouse trap, along comes a smarter mouse and a more devious rat.

    They can hack you, embarrass you, and humiliate you.

    That is, if you let them.

    If, for the sake of convenience, you share who you are with them.

    Easier said than done in an age banks have our data online, and we share personal photos with the world.

    It saves us stamps, even as we stamp out our privacy.

    Sometimes, it's just common sense not to share compromising stuff.

    But it sure is easier.

    Until it's not.

    Until we're embarrassed.

    Until we realize for lack of a hard disk in the safety of our own homes, we've opened up our personal and financial lives for anyone and his uncle.

    That doesn't mean we can't trust anybody.

    Just the billions who share something called the World Wide Web.