• Every club has its rules, and if you're in the mainstream media, I can boil it down just one -- just this --

    Guys with money bad. Guys without money good.

    Everything flows from there.

    It really does. Actually, it's ingrained in all media, and has been...for like...ever!!

    Don't believe me? Then I dare you to find me a movie where business wasn't evil or the rich guy wasn't awful.

    It's a pattern. And a consistent one, because it's such an easy one. Even if it's a harmless one.

    Whether it's poor George Bailey battling a heartless banker in "It's a Wonderful Life" or a clueless oil company stomping on penguins' "Happy Feet."

    Same dance. Same song. Same movie. Every time. All the time.

    Now, that's not to say there aren't bad bankers, there are.

    Or slippery oil men, there are.

    But I suspect no more as a percentage in their industries, than jerks in other industries.

    But you wouldn't know that, given this media knee-jerk to call 'em all jerks.

    To portray all priests as pedophiles.

    Or anyone pushing tax cuts, as greedy.

    Or anyone questioning doubling the minimum wage as doubly greedy.

    It gets old. It gets lazy. It gets predictable.

    But in my media club, you get a club to your head if you challenge those views in the media.

    If you dare point out the top 40 percent of taxpayers paid all the taxes.

    And the top five percent about half of all those taxes.

    Some say they "should" because, after all, they have it.

    So everyone else gets a pass, because, I guess, they don't?

    That's not fair. That's not balanced. That's not right.

    Just like it is not right to call all priests pathetic.

    Some go on to become pope, and suddenly they're, well, prophetic.

    Remember that as you do a hatchet job on anyone who dares question doubling what fast food workers make on the job.

    Maybe some of those questioning it really do worry about those workers losing their jobs.

    They're not thoughtless. They're thinking.

    Just like those who question throwing more money at fixing our roads and bridges aren't against roads and bridges.

    Maybe they're just wondering what the heck Washington did with the hundreds of billions of dollars we've already given them to fix our roads and bridges.

    It isn't callous to ask. It's clueless not to ask.

    It isn't selfish to demand accountability. It is stupid not to even find it important.

    But woe to the media figure who figures that figures matter. That dollars and cents matter. That throwing good money after bad matters.

    That questioning how "one out of three" people in this country are getting some sort of food assistance in this country means something's wrong in this country.

    Now they're not for starving Americans who genuinely need help.

    They're starving for answers for Americans who pay for this help.

    Gladly. But not stupidly.

    Kindly. But not cluelessly.

    The rich need no lobby.

    But I'm telling you common sense does.