• With: Mark Murphy

    This is a rush transcript from "Your World," November 26, 2013. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: You know, it turns out you don`t need nasty weather or busy holidays to be delayed, new numbers showing that one in five flights right now are delayed at any given point for pretty much any reason.

    And travel insider Mark Murphy says it`s only going to get worse, holidays or not. Mark is the founder of TravelPulse.com.

    Explain. So, even going into the holiday, we`re dicey at committing to being on time.

    MARK MURPHY, PRESIDENT, TRAVALLIANCE: Right.

    So, imagine 30 airports, 70 percent of the traffic goes through them. And what they`re projecting in five years from the U.S. Travel Association`s recent numbers is that 24 of those airports are going to have delays like you see tomorrow on Thanksgiving -- you know, pre-Thanksgiving travel, you are going to see that at least one day a week going forward within five years.

    So, we are in an infrastructure crisis in the travel business. The travel industry is trying to rally and trying to get government to upgrade things like air traffic control. It`s still radar-based. They have got to move to a satellite-based system, which will create more lanes of traffic, meaning more carriers can fly.

    CAVUTO: But isn`t the fact that...

    MURPHY: Yes.

    CAVUTO: ... a lot of people are drawn to fly at certain times, that we have got to spread that wealth out a little bit?

    MURPHY: Well, yes.

    And what they can do with the satellite-based system is put more planes in the air at different -- at different altitudes, and therefore have more traffic and route people around better than they currently can with the radar-based.

    CAVUTO: So pack more up there?

    MURPHY: Correct, yes.

    You could have more flights, and you can organize it better and manage it better. And that -- that is a huge, critical thing when it comes to aviation. People don`t realize, aviation contributes 10 million jobs and 5 percent of the GDP to our economy. So, if the aviation industry takes a hit because you can`t get people where they want to go...

    CAVUTO: Yes.

    MURPHY: ... the -- the unmet demand costs are tremendous.

    CAVUTO: Well, let me -- you can -- you`re the expert here. Update me on what airlines can and cannot do right now. They`re -- they`re saying that they`re not going to charge you extra for having to switch flights. And that`s intra-airline, right?

    MURPHY: Well, what they`re -- what...

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: If you`re at Delta, you have to change on another Delta flight the next day, they are not going to charge you. Are they all honoring that?

    MURPHY: But that`s -- that`s only in the case of this weather issue. That`s...

    CAVUTO: If it`s not a weather issue...

    MURPHY: Then forget it.

    CAVUTO: So if I`m anxious about flying out tomorrow...

    MURPHY: Tough.

    CAVUTO: Tough.

    MURPHY: Unless -- unless they think there are going to be cancellations. And right now you`re seeing the airlines being proactive.

    CAVUTO: Right.

    MURPHY: Because the last thing you want to do is have a pileup at the airport, people waiting, people waiting to get out. It stresses them.

    CAVUTO: Do other airlines honor other airlines? In other words, if I -- the only flight I can find is United, and I was flying Delta...

    MURPHY: If United can`t get you out, they have the option of endorsing that ticket over...

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: Who endorses it?

    MURPHY: So they -- United would endorse it over to Delta. The revenue would go to Delta.

    CAVUTO: Where would I do that?

    MURPHY: Well, you would have to talk to the people at United, see if they`re willing to do that.

    CAVUTO: To a person...

    MURPHY: Yes.