• With: Dr. Marc Siegel, Gretchen Hamel

    This is a rush transcript from "Your World," June 28, 2013. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    REP. NANCY PELOSI, D-CALIF., HOUSE MINORITY LEADER: This week marks one year since the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act. It captures the spirit of our founders, the spirit they wrote in the Declaration of Independence, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The Affordable Care Act offers just that.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: I had no idea they were talking about the health care law back then. I thought they were a bunch of guys in wigs just doing other stuff.

    Anyway, Nancy fancies the health care law, but as the House Democratic liter gets ready to celebrate, our next guests want to set the record straight.

    Dr. Marc Siegel and taxpayer watchdog Gretchen Hamel ,in order to have independence, you need to have choices.

    And, Doctor, you were telling me coming up here that this has offered anything but independence.

    DR. MARC SIEGEL, NYU SCHOOL OF MEDICINE: I wonder if Nancy Pelosi, in the three years since the law passed, has actually read it yet. She said she wanted to have to pass it before we know what is in it.

    It's anything but independence. Independence, Neil, is exercising, changing your diet, preventing diseases from occurring. Dependence is dependence on insurance, dependence on everything being covered, all preexisting conditions, all preventative services, the bells and whistles. That's dependence. Use the insurance when you don't need it. Pay a high premium. Pay every penny you have, so you can have insurance. That's dependence.

    This is rhetoric and it's really disingenuous and I think it's an insult to the American people.

    CAVUTO: All right, I'm going to put you down as a maybe on the health care law.

    (LAUGHTER)

    CAVUTO: Gretchen, what do you think of this and for the former speaker to go to the extent she did to say that this is exactly what our Founding Fathers would have wanted?

    (LAUGHTER)

    GRETCHEN HAMEL, FOUNDER, ENDEAVOUR GLOBAL STRATEGIES: I think -- I think she know different Founding Fathers than we now.

    Earlier in the week, she said it's fabulous. Now she is saying it's a reason to celebrate this Independence Day. But a dependence upon government and an increased role in government in our everyday lives and having a say in what our health situation is, that is not a reason to celebrate.

    And just the promises that they sold this plan on have not panned out. And I think it has the American public a little confused. We have seen our premium goes up, our plans are changing, and we're already starting to see doctor shortages. This is not a reason to celebrate at all.

    CAVUTO: You know, Doctor, as doctor, you have seen it up close better than any of us. But the people for whom this was intended, the uninsured, what was it, the survey, two out of three, they're not flipping over it or inclined that they would be part of it.

    Furthermore, low-wage Americans, for whom it is also expected to benefit, close to two out of three of them don't want anything to do with it. So, bottom line, we upended an entire health care system that was the envy of the world for something that we are billions shy supporting.

    SIEGEL: Neil, to put it another way, 88 percent of people were covered before. Now we're trying to get up to 95 percent. And in order to do that, a lot of employers are going to be dumping the people that they have on the health insurance. They're going to make people part-time so that they don't have to cover them. They're going to the state changes and find they can't afford the premiums there. The government is going to have to go in and subsidize everyone and some people won't qualify for that. They will fit in the gap.

    More and more premiums are going up, as you said before, so people won't get access, and then with the doctor shortage you won't get access to the care you need now under the Affordable Care Act, which is not affordable.

    CAVUTO: Well, obviously, there's a push to sell the good stuff.

    And I think part of that, Gretchen, has been those with preexisting conditions, to the doctor's point. Kids, you can keep the policy, yet another reason for them to live with you for the rest of your life, so there's that. And they can say, all right, look at that, and that's the good, and that's what they're going to be pushing. And that's why they're hitting up the NFL and the NBA to attract young people to be part of this.

    Is any of that working?

    HAMEL: Well, I think we're waiting to see if that's going to work or not.

    This -- they have just now kicked off their big plan to start getting more and more people enrolled in this, and they are targeting young...

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: Young people. They need young people to pay in.

    HAMEL: Well, it will be interesting to see if they can buy in.

    (CROSSTALK)

    CAVUTO: Do you think they can, Doctor?

    HAMEL: Because, young people, they don't get insurance. They don't want to be part of this program.

    SIEGEL: Neil, young people don't need -- just to this point that she's making, young people don't need these kind of policies. They need catastrophic policies.

    HAMEL: Yes.

    SIEGEL: They need something, if you happen to run into a tree when you're skiing that it will cover you in the emergency room. What do you need the kind of coverage where you can go to a doctor whenever you need it, when you're not even sick? That should be paid out of pocket. That should be with flexible spending accounts. That should be tax-deductible. We need incentives for weight loss, incentives for exercise.

    CAVUTO: Well, they say that is there. You say it's not.

    SIEGEL: It's not emphasized in there at all. It's not a large part of the bill. What is a large part of the bill is young people paying high premiums.

    CAVUTO: All right. Guys, thank you both very, very much. Content and Programming Copyright 2013 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2013 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.