• This is a rush transcript from "Your World with Neil Cavuto," December 19, 2007. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: First Hillary Clinton, now the ad rush by all the presidential candidates to show their softer side.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, OBAMA CAMPAIGN AD)

    SEN. BARACK OBAMA (D-IL), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I'm Barack Obama, and I approve this message.

    MALIA ANN OBAMA, OBAMA'S ELDEST DAUGHTER: Merry Christmas.

    NATASHA OBAMA, OBAMA'S YOUNGER DAUGHTER: Happy holidays.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, HUCKABEE CAMPAIGN AD)

    MIKE HUCKABEE (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I hope that you and your family will have a magnificent Christmas season.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, CLINTON CAMPAIGN AD)

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The Hillary I know is a funny, warm, genuinely caring person.

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was just so engaging and so compassionate and so warm.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, GIULIANI CAMPAIGN AD)

    RUDOLPH GIULIANI (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: And I really hope that all of the presidential candidates can just get along.

    (LAUGHTER)

    UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I was with the right up until that last one.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    Well, a warm and fuzzy side, even a funny side. Either you have it, though, or you don't.

    So, do these ads do anything to convince people?

    With us now, a GOP presidential candidate Texas congressman. He joins us now from Manchester, New Hampshire. And, to the best of my knowledge, the congressman has not run one warm and fuzzy ad.

    Congressman, what do you think of this?

    REP. RON PAUL (R-TX), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: What do I think of what, Neil? I don't quite get it.

    CAVUTO: So, I can't see you doing these type of ads. Do you think they are a waste of time?

    PAUL: Well, I have not made a judgment. It seems irrelevant. It seems to me I would rather talk about monetary policy and foreign policy in spending.

    So, some of these ads, I — I don't think, are too important. But we have an ad about a merry Christmas ad, and I don't think it is necessarily bad.

    CAVUTO: All right, well, because a lot of the people who know you very well, Congressman, say actually you are very funny and that you're a very warm guy yourself.

    Now, most people exposed to you on the campaign trail know that you are the guy with the libertarian views and tough positions on taxes and Iraq.

    Would it help those who don't you to know that — that warm and fuzzy side of Ron Paul?

    PAUL: Well, I would hope so, but I have warm and fuzzy positions.

    You know, I believe in freedom and limited government and let the people along. So, that is pretty warm and fuzzy, you know, allowing people to lead their own lives. So, I don't think the ad, just to deal with personalities, is not very necessary.

    CAVUTO: Do you think they work, though, that these type — you have been around this before. You have been, you know, in Congress for many years. You have tried this presidential thing before.

    Do you think that these type of ads register with people, just as someone who watches the process?

    PAUL: No.

    I would say that the people who are joining our campaign by the tens-of-thousands, if not hundreds-of-thousands, and those who are sending the money are not motivated by that. I mean, I think they like to know who I am, and they like — they want to know me and like me and know I'm a grandfather and like kids.

    But I think what motivates them are my political beliefs and what I believe in the Constitution and monetary policy. That is what energizes people. But I don't think you can divorce it completely from the personality. But, if you have bad policies, and you think you can overcome bad policy with, you know, these fuzzy ads, and think that personality is going to overcome bad policy, won't work, no way.

    But, if you can get good policies and a good personality, then I think it is great.

    CAVUTO: Congressman, let me ask you. You talk about the amount of money you have raised over the Internet and for your campaign in general. And it is staggering, last Sunday alone, $6 million-plus.