• This is a partial transcript from "Your World with Neil Cavuto," July 6, 2005, that was edited for clarity.

    NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: What does President Bush need to do so satisfy G-8 partners (search) and stick to his guns? Let us ask the head of New Voters Alliance, Herman Cain (search).

    Herman, as you know, the president getting an earful from people, saying he's generous enough on African aid; he's not doing enough about his deficits; he's not saying enough about how to deal with Iraq. He's getting it on all sides. What do you make of that?

    HERMAN CAIN, CEO, T.H.E. NEW VOICE: You don't appease in order to lead. I think the president's stance of sticking to his guns, as they say, as well as trying to expand the discussion on the really big issues.

    I mean, that Kyoto treaty (search) was not good for America. And I support the president and the fact that he didn't sign it.

    CAVUTO: You're talking about the environmental treaty that almost everybody signed on to.

    CAIN: Yes

    CAVUTO: He did not, claiming that it saddled the U.S. with an unfair burden of the cost, right?

    CAIN: It unfairly saddled the U.S.

    CAVUTO: Right.

    CAIN: And also, right now, it is almost irrelevant, because you have two of the biggest nations in the world, China and India, that are not even at the table. So, if we were to sign something restrictive like that, and you have almost half of the population of the world represented by those two countries, it doesn't make any sense.

    So, I believe that the president is doing the right thing, and he is making this a leadership moment.

    CAVUTO: All right. But some of his co-leaders don't flip over him. Should we care as Americans?

    CAIN: No, we should not.

    (LAUGHTER)

    CAVUTO: His first responsibility, in all honesty, is to lead this nation.

    And, remember, I told you on one of the previous shows that my definition of a leader is someone who takes people to where they would not go by themselves. That means that you don't appease. You lead. That means that you face the big issue, much like he has done here at home. You know, the president had the courage to tee up Social Security, even though he has been attacked and attacked and smeared.

    He had the courage to lead. And I do believe that we are going to make some progress. So, the situation is the same here. He is dealing with other leaders of other big countries, but he has to stand his guns, because his main responsibility is to lead this nation first, and work with the other leaders around the world second.

    CAVUTO: Herman, what do you make of the fact that the people who oppose the president on Iraq are those countries that are right now in the most disarray? France and its economy really on the mat. Germany now calling early elections. Jacques Chirac's popularity waning. What are we to make of that?

    CAIN: I call it politics.

    You know, just like you have politics here in this country, we have got politics all over the world. Just like we have some liberal media outlets here in this country, you have got some liberal media outlets in other parts of the world. And this is what we are up against. Whenever you try to do the right thing, whenever you try to be honest with people, and you try to solve problems instead of putting another temporary Band-Aid on, then you are going to get beat up by some of those communications constituencies out there.

    CAVUTO: Yes, but it can be protesters, too, right?

    CAIN: Yes.

    CAVUTO: I mean, you can't get these G8 guys together without getting the guys protesting. How much should they and their demands that the rich countries open up their wallets weigh on these participants?

    CAIN: Well, Neil, you know, more aid is not the long-term solution to what the problems that some of these countries have.

    It's more trade. You know, Uncle Sam cannot be Uncle Sucker to the rest of the world forever. We can't just throw money at every problem. And one of the things that I think we have learned from the past is that, when we provide significant aid -- and, first of all, no one is providing more aid, more assistance, than the United States. We have forgiven debt for 38 countries. We are stepping up and giving more money with respect to the world hunger effort.

    We are providing the aid, but we cannot be the sucker nation, where we just open up our treasury without some strings attached, so people can basically help themselves. You know, even if you are talking to a homeless person on the street, in order for them to eventually be able to feed themselves, they are going to have to make a decision to do so.

    You know that old saying. You can give a man a fish, he can eat for a day, but teach a man to fish, he can eat for a lifetime. We have got to teach people how to take care of themselves. And that means more trade and not just more aid.

    CAVUTO: All right, Herman, always a pleasure. Thank you, sir, very much.

    CAIN: Thank you, Neil.

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