President Obama's legacy on the line? Gutfeld: When evil talks, why don't we listen?

Published Friday, September 13, 2013 / The Five

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," September 13, 2013. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. I'm Kimberly Guilfoyle, along with Juan Williams, Eric Bolling, Dana Perino, and Greg Gutfeld.

It's 5 o'clock in New York City, and this is "The Five."

(MUSIC)

GUILFOYLE: New comments from President Obama this afternoon on Syria.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: Any agreement needs to be verifiable and enforceable. Ultimately, what's needed for the underlying conflict is a political settlement that allows ordinary Syrians to get back to their homes, to rebuild, and to relieve the enormous suffering that's taking place.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: The remarks come as trust in the government to solve America's problems hits a new low. A brand-new Gallup poll shows less than half the country now has confidence in the Obama administration's ability to handle international and domestic issues. Commentators certainly feel that's true this week after the president mishandling of the Syria situation.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CHARLIE ROSE: Whether there's a developing idea that the president is not so good at foreign policy, number one. And number two, whether this whole Syrian crisis will just take more air out of whatever leverage he has for the future of his administration.

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, FOX NEWS: These are the fruits of a completely incompetent, epically incompetent foreign policy diplomacy by Obama.

DANA MILBANK, THE WASHINGTON POST: I think if you're a supporter of the president you should be critical of him. You're not doing him any favors by just sitting silently when he's screwing things up.

BILL O'REILLY, FOX NEWS HOST: Most Americans are finally realizing, and I mean that finally realizing, that this country is losing power on almost all fronts. And if that trend is not arrested and soon, that will be Barack Obama's legacy.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

GUILFOYLE: Ominous words from a great leader, Bill O'Reilly.

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: Oh, my gosh.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Greg can't handle it.

GUTFELD: Ugh, I'm going to throw up.

GUILFOYLE: Please, not until after 6:00.

All right. Bolling, what do you make of this?

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: OK. So, the poll you put up there was Gallup Poll, right, and they call it America's trust I guess in President Obama. We call it leadership.

You know, remember when President Reagan, a real leader, said, "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down that wall", that signaled the end of the Cold War. Russia went through years, decades, on their heels, high unemployment, their economy struggled, their military starved, they're, you know, in the doghouse. Enter Vladimir Putin, who brings them back, meanwhile, we get President Obama who puts us in a wussification redistribution economy, and one economy growing, one people's getting stronger and the other one doing the opposite.

Leadership, I should just stop, because a picture says a thousand words. Here's -- watch.

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my goodness.

BOLLING: Which one? Which one do you want leading your country?

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: I'm going with the bike. I'm going to go with the bike.

GUTFELD: You like the shirtless guy? You like the shirtless guy in the woods?

BOLLING: I like the shirtless guy holding the rifle.

JUAN WILLIAMS, CO-HOST: Oh my gosh.

BOLLING: I mean, which one is more -- which one would you --

WILLIAMS: You're like the -- you like the made-up photo. You like the pretend photo.

GUILFOYLE: Greg lost his shirt and he's going to be wondering in the wilderness, Bolling, in case you're interested. Oh my goodness.

All right. So, Dana, let's talk about this, because this is, a concern for many Americans because they're worried about how we are looking in the world. Are people worried about our president taking some action? No, are they going to say, listen, the guy who's actually making moves, that's determining the course of events here and in the Middle East, is Putin.

PERINO: Well, I think that America looks at this more in sadness than in anger, in a lot of ways. Because it's just -- it has been embarrassing. But you also kind of, it's one of those things where you don't want to admit that it's embarrassing and you want to say, yes, absolutely, this is the plan, this is the diplomatic route we are going to take and the president, we're right behind you.

And that's -- a lot of people would like to be able to get to that place. But unfortunately, the administration continues to give you reasons, even if you want to help them, they have to say, ridiculous things about their opponents on every issue, right after they've caused an international embarrassment for the last two weeks.

GUILFOYLE: All right. Greg, comments? I want to play --

GUTFELD: I think it's a mistake, however, to think this is unintended. This is President Obama's greatest achievement, which he predicted to bring America down a notch. Remember, America as an exceptional being was the problem.

And wait, President Obama was like Babe Ruth. He got up and he pointed to the fence and he said we're going to strike out. And he did.

The problem is his failure is now ours. He has spread failure around just like our wealth. We've all had our fair share of failure. It sucks.

Now, we have the axis of Al Qaeda, Iran, North Korea, Syria. It reveals a truth that the absence of good gives consent to evil.

GUILFOYLE: Profound.

GUTFELD: Thank you.

GUILFOYLE: Only four minutes into the show.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: I hate vacuuming.

BOLLING: Did he point to center field and say we're going to strike out or did he say we're going to tie?

GUTFELD: Yes.

BOLLING: We definitely don't want to lose.

PERINO: We're going to walk.

BOLLING: We're going to work.

GUILFOYLE: Let's get Juan Williams in here. I hope you can bring some amazing points to this discussion. I know you --

WILLIAMS: Well, I was just listening in wonder. I mean, to me the American people have been very clear. They don't want military action here. You know. I mean, so --

GUILFOYLE: As opposed to conflict.

WILLIAMS: Right. So, if you have a president who says oh, let's go do it anyway. I think people would say I didn't feel that was the right -- OK. But to Greg's point I think that the president has meandered, he hasn't had a clear policy. It borders on incoherent to the casual viewer, people following the news here on "The Five," and I think that's why it opens him to his critics.

But do I think that it's evidence of some kind of malfeasance or evidence that America is losing power? No. America is the most powerful country in the world. Imagine --

GUILFOYLE: But you're only as good as your commander-in-chief --

WILLIAMS: Let me just say something, let me just finish this. What if Putin said oh, yes, I'm going to take you guys on?

GUILFOYLE: He did.

WILLIAMS: He would be a biggest fool --

GUILFOYLE: He's taken us on.

WILLIAMS: Come on.

GUILFOYLE: He's taken us on.

WILLIAMS: He's not taking us on.

GUILFOYLE: He has stepped into a leadership vacuum unfortunately. Barack Obama is my president. I want him to do well. I don't want this to be an embarrassment where it's completely mishandled.

WILLIAMS: Oh, yes.

GUILFOYLE: So, then, I'm looking at Carney to see what he has to say. Cue the carnival.

GUTFELD: Wow. Carney evil.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JAY CARNEY, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY: Being a commander-in-chief, I think that the American people, at least in my assessment, appreciate commander-in-chief who takes in new information, and doesn't, you know, celebrate decisiveness for the sake of decisiveness.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: Goodness. My goodness. Is there a vitamin?

PERINO: This is what they do best, swipes at the former president. Even if the former president's entire national security apparatus is trying to help them last week, they can't -- they can't stop just for the sake of take little swipes.

What they're referring to is at one time in the Rose Garden, President Bush was asked a question by a reporter, he used to take questions from reporters, and in the White House, and somebody asked him about well why haven't you done this, why haven't you done that? And he said, because I'm the decider.

And you know, that's -- so that's what the swipe is. They don't like decisiveness because we actually are -- they want us to look smaller than we are.

WILLIAMS: Oh, stop.

PERINO: Yes they do. Yes --

WILLIAMS: You know what, if you're taking a swipe --

PERINO: It's being praised (ph) of being unexceptional.

WILLIAMS: Let me just say you, my friend, are taking now a swipe at Obama. But I want to take a moment of praise for President Bush.

PERINO: I have been backing up Obama for the last two weeks.

WILLIAMS: Wait, wait, let me just say. I think that President Obama and his team have -- I'm sorry, President Bush and his team have been very supportive of what is the right action here, which is defending the United States in terms of saying no to the use of chemical weapons and signaling no to Iran, North Korea, and to Al Qaeda.

PERINO: Why? Because they want America to be strong. I don't think America get's stronger when you have from the White House podium that's supposed to represent all Americans, swipes at a former president who actually is trying to help you.

WILLIAMS: I know you're -- I know it's your former boss. But, look, let's rise above the pettiness.

PERINO: Juan, this is --

GUILFOYLE: Oh, boy.

PERINO: Did anybody ever actually have the decency to say something like that when we were there?

WILLIAMS: Of course -- what do you mean? What do you mean?

PERINO: No, it was all partisan politics all the time from the other side. And from the White House that was --

WILLIAMS: Oh, I don't know about all the other side but I am not anti-Bush. So, I mean, that's just not clear to say.

PERINO: I didn't say you were.

WILLIAMS: OK.

GUILFOYLE: I know you are.

GUTFELD: You kids fighting as always.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: You have a quick comment on that? Because I want you to take a cruise with me next.

(LAUGHTER)

GUTFELD: I have no idea what that means.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SEN. TED CRUZ (R), TEXAS: Autocrats have reason to fear when Americans focus on our principles and focus on exceptionalism because it's been American exceptionalism that stood up to the Nazis and stopped the murder from the Nazis, and it was American exceptionalism that stood up to the Soviet Union and freed hundreds of millions from behind the Iron Curtain. So, Putin is right to be concerned about American exceptionalism.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: You talk a lot about this, Greg.

GUTFELD: Yes. Well, the fact is there's a pernicious ideology that comes from the teacher's lounge that says Goliath must be defeated by David. And the United States is Goliath. We must be defeated or become David without the sling shot.

What I believe is right now President Obama is building a case for Republican presidency that the Republicans never could have done on their own. It's as if Karl Rove is wearing an Obama mask and doing it himself. The shrinking stature is making way for the need for a scary adult. The Reagan that came after Carter. Right?

GUILFOYLE: Eric?

WILLIAMS: No.

GUTFELD: Don't you think?

BOLLING: I don't know. I don't know.

Look, for decades, the grown-ups were running the GOP. We're running Washington, but, and the people like me, the far righties were called fringe. I guess we're still considered fringe.

But the grown-ups have grown old. They're clinging to the notion that you can just kind of carpet bomb people in believing your way of -- the way the world should be. What we really need to do is recognize globalization is happening. Economic globalization is happening. Ask China, ask Brazil, ask Singapore. While we're looking at who we're going to bomb next, they're figuring out who they're going to sell stuff to next and they're starting to eat our lunch and we need to refocus our efforts on the economy.

When we do that, when we bring it here and stop worrying about whether or not we should be going into Syria, which we shouldn't, create some jobs instead, that's what we really need.

GUILFOYLE: You just want to give hugs and jobs.

BOLLING: Well, you know what?

GUIFOYLE: Jobs are going to cure it.

BOLLING: You look at Ted Cruz and you go, look, here's a smart guy, Harvard educated young, conservative, far right guy, who probably doesn't want to go to war either, that's the new blood in the GOP. I love that. I embrace that.

WILLIAMS: No, wait, wait, wait. You can embrace Rand Paul saying I have a libertarian posse, I think the United States shouldn't be all over the world. I think there are lots of young people by the way, the Obama base, who are attracted to that kind of message coming from a Republican.

But when you hear Ted Cruz going after the president in this way, I just think, you what, if it's the far right now has become so isolationist because they hate Obama so much that they're absolutely going to hurt America's vital interests?

GUILFOYLE: It's not a personal hate.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: I think it's very fair. How is it fair for Ted Cruz to be saying these things?

BOLLING: No, no, I would say the far right hates the government. The far right hates taxing and spending and redistributing wealth. They like to see smaller government, smaller tax -- smaller base, get out of the bedroom, get out of our businesses. Let us thrive and prosper the way we have for 230 years.

WILLIAMS: Well, that's fine. But you can't ignore an international crisis.

GUTFELD: I think the, you know, I think there's a middle ground here between you two, the right has to be able to exert might, or the wrong will sing the song. I just made that up.

The point is, America is a good force in the world and when that force goes away, there are people that will fill that void and they're not going to be as good as we are. As much I would like to be on libertarian island and I often am, the only way you can be on libertarian island and have these freedoms is be able to kill for it.

WILLIAMS: Right. You have to stand up at some point, don't you, Eric?

BOLLING: No, Greg is taking the establishment out for a spin. When you go back out to libertarian island. Come on back onboard.

No, I don't -- I think the world is, look --

WILLIAMS: You're trying to bully. This is schoolyard bullying by Eric Bolling.

BOLLING: Look at how big China is getting. Look at how Brazil are getting. You don't hear about their armies growing and lining up their tanks and looking to attack anyone. They're doing it --

PERINO: In China?

GUILFOYLE: Yes, Dana?

BOLLING: They're doing it economically.

PERINO: China certainly is building up its military.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: I think we should build up our military even more. I want more military. I also think --

GUILFOYLE: Do you think it works?

PERINO: I think that reality is that the world will come to us, even if we don't want to be out there.

GUTFELD: Right.

PERINO: And so, if you look at the front page of The Washington Post today, India, Pakistan renew border might. Many fear U.S. pullout from Afghanistan will encourage militants.

Maybe we're comfortable with all of this. And the domino theory around the world, maybe we're going to be OK with that. But if we're going to do that, we had better figure out a way to become energy independent and quickly.

GUILFOYLE: Real quick, I want to bring this up. Full screen me, please.

U.S. enemies, are they emboldened by all of this? What we're talking about here today when you look at who's going on across the world, Al Qaeda chief calls for new attacks on the U.S. U.S. consulate in Afghanistan attacked. North Korea restarts their nuclear reactor. Iran, threatens retaliation if the U.S. strikes Syria, and Assad demands U.S. stop arming rebels, or he won't turn over the chemical weapons.

It doesn't sound like anybody's very afraid.

GUTFELD: OK. What -- when you put those things all together you sense that America is missing a sense of strength and will that somehow we've fallen into a slumber in the government crib because we're getting -- the baby is being fed and the baby doesn't care. That's what I worry about is that the American public has become satisfied with the free stuff that they get, not to care about what's happening overseas, and pretty soon we're going to be devoured by these young aggressive countries.

And the only things that are going to be left are these frigid eyeballs on our skeleton who saw it coming but didn't care.

BOLLING: Can I push back? Who's going to devour it? Terrorism?

GUTFELD: Well, we need to keep -- we always need to be diligent about that. If Iran gets a nuclear reactor -- nuclear arms, that's a problem. Russia, arming Syria, and arming --

BOLLING: I'm not sure Iran likes us any more or less than Kim Jong-un.

GUTFELD: That's true.

GUILFOYLE: He likes Rodman.

BOLLING: There's nukes out there, there's biological weapons out there, there's chemical weapons out there.

PERINO: Are we or are we not --

BOLLING: I'm for strong military, but I'm not for an aggressive --

WILLIAMS: But let me just say -- every president, every president has these crises. I mean, you go back, Reagan was a strong leader. He was a strong leader.

But guess what happened to the marine barracks in Beirut? I mean, you know, these things happen. These crises happen.

GUILFOYLE: But he was respected and feared. A healthy amount of fear is a good thing.

WILLIAMS: You could fear him, he had the peacekeeper, you can talk in those terms but you act as if just because Obama is in office these things are happening, America is weaker. America is as strong as ever.

GUTFELD: But, no, Juan the point is, this is what President Obama wanted. He had a fundamental disdain for exceptionalism and he felt it was time for America to pull back not because he was worried he you know thought we were being too angry. He just doesn't like a large, successful country. He wants a European-style democracy. Am I right?

WILLIAMS: No.

GUTFELD: No?

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: You disagree, Juan.

Eric?

BOLLING: Look, I think I could just leave it there. We absolutely have to have a strong military. But not one that --

WILLIAMS: Amen.

BOLLING: -- is aggressive in seeking conflicts that frankly aren't ours.

PERINO: Well, there's -- again, the reality is our commitment to Israel. And do we keep it or not?

GUTFELD: Mm-hmm.

PERINO: And I say we keep it. I would think a lot of people say we keep it. OK, then you have to get to the practical reality of how do you do that going forward?

BOLLING: Strengthening Israel.

WILLIAMS: No. We have to protect Israel. What are you talking about?

BOLLING: I said strengthening Israel. You can be supportive of Israel. You can supply technology, arms to Israel without attacking Iran or Syria.

WILLIAMS: Let me shake for a second, brother, and I ask, if somebody attacked Israel, you think we're just going to sit here?

BOLLING: No. And that's the point. Syria hasn't attacked any of our allies or American interests.

GUILFOYLE: Juan just got hands-on.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: To the left and not to the right.

OK. Directly ahead, who's doing better in Obama's economy? Rich people or poor people? Some surprising new statistics you probably won't hear about in the mainstream media. That's next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: 2008, soon-to-be President Barack Obama promised to fundamentally transform America. And as promised, he's overseen the largest redistribution of American wealth in American history, entitlement programs have exploded -- welfare, food stamps, Obama phones and more. Yet poverty in America sits at a decades-high 15.9 percent. In fact, under President O, the rich have gotten richer and the middle class is now home to the fastest growing sector of the economy when it comes to poverty.

But remember the class warfare lectures he delivered ad nauseam?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

OBAMA: Top-down economics never works. The country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. We succeed when the middle class gets bigger, when more people have a chance to get ahead. More people have a chance to live up to their God-given potential.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Obama-nomics has failed, folks, has failed the middle class. Check out these numbers. The A.P. says best times for the 1 percent since the '20s. The Wall Street Journal says some 95 percent of 2009 to 2012 income gains went to the wealthiest 1 percent.

K.G., why does President Bush dislike the middle class so much?

GUILFOYLE: I don't know.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Love us back the way we tried. Not a good relationship. Counseling can't save it.

Listen, the problem is, he feels like he has to, I think, to people he feels are supporting him. He doesn't understand that he's ultimately hurting all of us, all Americans when he engages in this kind of, you know, I guess practice, a business where he's not worried about creating the jobs, he's putting forward, for example -- look, ObamaCare.

This is going to get much worse because now we're going to have a nation of part-time, low-income workers with very little job security. How is that going to stabilize the economy? How is that going to bring new cash flow and stimulate the economy like we need it to? I don't think it's going to. It's a problem.

BOLLING: Dana, they point out a lot of the gains over the last four years went to the top 1 percent. So the people in the lowest level, the poverty people, aren't really getting out of poverty. The middle class is moving into the poverty area and the only one benefiting under the Obama economy are the top 1 percent.

PERINO: Right. So I guess if I were in the White House I think that the National Economic Council people are probably asking themselves, OK, what is the root cause of the problem?

I think with all good intentions they believe that their policies are actually working. They want a green economy and they think that that's going to work. But I think greater economic freedom is really the only answer time and men America learns this lesson the best way to do it is to let people spend the money that they earn to invest it back into the economy. Education also, when it comes to the jobs that needs to be competitive in the world, that is also another huge problem. And John Taylor at Stanford University Hoover Institute, when he wrote about it this week opened my eyes.

You know, I don't know what I would tell a young person today, except I would say you need to be a person of the world, a lot of math and science, and you also have to be willing to take risk. Risk is -- peel are getting more and more risk averse because they have the government to fall back on.

BOLLING: They don't need to take it.

GUILFOYLE: That's very true.

BOLLING: Greg, the -- the Occupy Wall Street, remember the 1 percent and they hated the 1 percenters. But lLook at what's going on under President Obama, the 1 percent has thrived.

GUTFELD: He truly is the best friend of the 1 percenter. It's not just the rich that got richer. It's the government that got richer. Thanks to the rich, the government has collected I guess more taxes in history, they're greedier than Kimberly at a shoe store.

I mean, it is nuts. Nobody -- everyone was, oh, my God the rich got richer, but the government is swelling and getting larger. And, by the way, I don't think it's going to get any better because we can still sink lower as long as President Obama rejects Keystone and demonizes fracking, our demise will keep going.

He's like the Nutrisystem of politicians. He's cut our economy by like 40 percent, you know?

WILLIAMS: You know, I've got to say -- this is the most amazing conversation. I feel like this is Alice in wonderland. I mean, I don't know how you guys managed to turn this on its head.

GUTFELD: Who am I?

WILLIAMS: I mean, it seems to me -- Mad Hatter? But it seems to me unbelievable that you guys ignore the reality the rich have gotten much richer and guess what? There was a terrible economic collapse when this president came in. And guess what? The president is the one who's been standing up and saying, you know what? The rich should pay more in terms of taxes in this society in --

PERINO: That's the point.

WILLIAMS: And so, what's the great -- and Wall Street, is Wall Street out there protesting against President Obama?

BOLLING: Juan, 15.9 percent in America, poverty in America, the highest in four decades.

WILLIAMS: Yes, and that's all because of the president's policies?

BOLLING: Well, they're certainly not helping.

WILLIAMS: Oh, I see.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: You really think that that's -- you really think that -- do you honestly believe that that would change if all of a sudden there were higher taxes?

WILLIAMS: No, no, I think it would change if there were more mobility, Dana, if young people had the opportunity to succeed in this country. Instead the rich are taking all the money.

GUTFELD: The ladder has become a water slide.

BOLLING: We need to go ahead.

Ahead, ObamaCare goes live in a couple of weeks and big labor has joined the rebellion to stop its rollout. President Obama meeting behind closed doors with union leaders just moments ago at the White House, will he cut them yet another sweetheart deal? Next in "The Five".

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PERINO: In just over two weeks, the most pivotal portion of ObamaCare kicks in when the insurance exchange is opened. Labor unions, some of the most vocal proponents of the law back in March of 2010 -- well, they're now seeking exemptions to the very law that they once championed. The big players in organized labor met with Obama at the White House earlier today where the health care law was the topic.

Take a look at how the views of one of those leaders, AFL-CIO head Richard Trumka, has changed since the law passed.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

RICHARD TRUMKA, AFL-CIO: We made a difference in this fight, and because of that, we're about to take an historic step towards our goal of providing quality health care to every American. This deal is a great step forward. It's going to give us long-term security.

We've been working with the administration to find solutions to what I think are inadvertent holes in the act. When the act was put together, it wasn't thought completely through.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: Inadvertent? I don't think so.

So what I found out today, Eric in looking into this, apparently the unions were told early on they continued to support it and that this would be fixed for them. They just left the White House and they declined to even make a statement. You never met a labor guy who declined to get in front of a camera.

BOLLING: You've got to love Richie Trumka, the earlier sound bite where he's pushing ObamaCare. They literally spent millions of dollars to make sure Obama care got through. And then, today, the last couple days, he made that comment, but he also said today that he's highly troubled by the ObamaCare.

Are you kidding me? They pushed it, they got it through, they spent the money to get it and now they don't like it. Like the rest of us.

PERINO: What do you think, Greg, about the turn about?

GUTFELD: Turnabout is fair play, Dana.

GUILFOYLE: I've heard that before.

GUTFELD: You know what's interesting about the administration? To ensure survival of the landmark achievement of ObamaCare, you have to promise everybody that they don't have to have it. It's like a defense attorney telling its client to take the deal because you won't actually do the time.

What does it say about ObamaCare? It's like the only people who support it are the people who don't have to endure it while the rest of us go through hell with it. It's just unfair, Dana. Unfair.

PERINO: One of the things --

GUTFELD: It's unfair.

PERINO: It's unfair. Turnabout is fair play.

Juan, one of the things that the unions basically said they want to do is they want to double dip, right? They want the employer contribution and they want to get the subsidies and looks like the White House, I think, they are going to be hard-pressed to try to carve out unions from this. But what do you think?

WILLIAMS: I agree with you.

PERINO: You really think that they're not going to?

WILLIAMS: I don't think they can do it. I think it's too big a carve out and I think it feeds in to the kind of opposition to ObamaCare that is so rampant on the right.

GUILFOYLE: And on the rise --

WILLIAMS: What the --

GUILFOYLE: By the way.

WILLIAMS: -- what the unions have said is they're not interested in the right wing agenda, which is repeal ObamaCare. They just want to fix this so that they get benefits. Because what they're worried about, to get back to our last segment with Eric is, they're worried that they're losing out in terms of benefit packages and the like in the midst of this recession, the middle class is shrinking, and what the unions, people who do have jobs are getting less in terms of those health care benefits and now, they want to take advantage of the subsidies that exist for poor people --

GUILFOYLE: But what makes them so special, because let me tell you something, the more they're able to squeeze out of Obama by telling him how upset they are with him it's going to be out of the pockets of middle-class Americans. That's what I find -- what makes them so special that they should be treated differently than the rest of Americans?

WILLIAMS: I hear my pal Greg over here --

GUILFOYLE: We're going to end up having to pay more.

WILLIAMS: ObamaCare isn't going to make one iota difference in your luxurious life.

GUTFELD: That doesn't matter because I'm a self-less person Juan and I care about the little people. Why can't all of us do this? Why can't we all exempt ourselves from specific parts of the administration's disasters? Why can't I say you know what? I don't want to have anything --

WILLIAMS: Giving insurance to people who don't have insurance?

BOLLING: Here's what --

PERINO: That's not what the unions are arguing.

BOLLING: Here's what they're arguing. They don't want to pass the tax on the Cadillac benefits that they were getting. Well, guess what? We pointed this out that this is what was going to happen. A year, two years ago, three years -- it's been three years now, right?

GUILFOYLE: They weren't listening.

BOLLING: But no, they were listening. They knew this. They pushed it through because they wanted to push it through because they were told to push it through.

PERINO: And they were told they'd get it fixed.

BOLLING: And they were told they were getting it fixed and now, they're coming back and saying, remember when you promised us this fix?

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: And it's getting late. I do think that there is a possible legislative solution to this. And Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee has been pushing for a delay for one year and it seems that was gaining a little bit of steam. But now, the unions I think are ready for the delay because they want the fix, so maybe we'll have a reprieve for a year where everybody has breathing room. There's pros and cons.

GUILFOYLE: It's like a rain delay, though. Eventually it's going to stop and then what? ObamaCare is still going to suck.

(LAUGHTER)

GUTFELD: Isn't this completely, Juan --

WILLIAMS: I don't know to do.

GUTFELD: I'm going to pile on -- this is such a liberal maneuver, such a liberal maneuver. I support abortion but don't abort me.

WILLIAMS: Don't abort you?

PERINO: Wow.

On that note --

GUILFOYLE: OK.

WILLIAMS: I want to love you up not abort you, brother.

PERINO: -- ahead on "The Five", actor Tom Hanks reports for jury duty, but the trial came to an abrupt end after one of the prosecutors tried to talk to him. And that led to a miscarriage of justice. We're going to tell you why, coming up.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUTFELD: Tuesday, I told you about the disgusting murder of Jeffrey Babbitt. He was decked by a racist coward looking for a white person to punch.

I asked if the press would cover this story the same way it had for other race tinged stories. I should have kept my mouth shut. "The New York Times" devoted 1,000 words to Martin Redrick, aka Lashawn Martin, aka racist dirtbag.

"The Times" author quickly cites Redrick's, who punched the guy, troubled background and trouble and his struggle with mental illness.

When a white man acts racist, he's obviously racist. But a black racist, mentally ill. Total double standard, "The Times" at its best.

So, how was this guy on the street with his long history of violence? He's been in and out of jail many times. He's been a threat to citizens with 20 run-ins with cops and still there he was free to kill on Union Square. Why is that?

His last punch is about race but also a cowardly culture that's given up its will to punish like refusing to hear Allahu Akbar before a jihadist killed 13 people, we block out the actual message the killer delivered because it's so damn uncomfortable.

So, here's what the killer said after he killed poor Jeffrey Babbitt and left Jeffrey's mother suffering from Alzheimer's without a caregiver. He said, "You think I'm afraid of these charges. I punched a police officer in Newburgh in front of a crowd of people and all his colleague and I was out of jail in 168 hours."

He said that. So, how come when evil speaks we don't listen?

BOLLING: "The New York Times" listens.

GUTFELD: Yes, I will give Eric -- "The New York Times", they did a long piece on the victim. But then they ruined it by the next day they felt like -- oh, well, their version of fair and balanced is to do something on the victim and then do the same amount on the killer, and blame his crimes on mental illness.

WILLIAMS: Well, he is schizophrenic.

GUTFELD: He says he doesn't like -- he doesn't like white people?

WILLIAMS: No, no, no. He said, he said that --

GUTFELD: Where is that?

WILLIAMS: He's punched black people. He's punched white people. He's punched Hispanic people. He was just arrested in Harlem for not only hitting a woman but spitting in her face.

GUILFOYLE: So this -- this is a defense?

WILLIAMS: No, no, no.

GUTFELD: He's saying he hates everybody.

WILLIAMS: No, no, look --

GUILFOYLE: Equal opportunity hater.

WILLIAMS: I grew up in Brooklyn. Believe me, black people hit black people. What are you talking?

BOLLING: Wait, wait, does that make you not racist because you've also punched a black guy --

WILLIAMS: No, no, look, I don't know if all the white people at the table are fearful of black people. I'm not going to hit.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: Yes, exactly what is going on here?

GUILFOYLE: You be careful.

WILLIAMS: This is nutty. But look, I think you have to ignore history if you're going to say oh, gee, you know the history of racial crime is mostly black on white in this country? Come on.

GUTFELD: Well, lately, what -- what's the biggest it's black on black. Correct?

WILLIAMS: By far, white on white, black on black, Hispanic on Hispanic.

GUTFELD: How does the media treat those factions of crimes in the media? How do you --

WILLIAMS: I wish they paid more attention to black on black I tell you that, because right now they pay, you know, one of my head teams pay a lot of attention to Trayvon Martin when they think it's white on black.

GUTFELD: Right.

WILLIAMS: But when it's black on black, which is far more of a threat to my daily existence, it's like oh, doesn't exist. Not news.

GUILFOYLE: You can make that point and I think you're accurate about that. But we can also make this point to say that it's a shame because these types of stories are treated much differently in the media. That is also true.

WILLIAMS: Well, no, it should be treated differently. I think there's a history, a pattern of racial crime that's not black on white in America. If you want it to look at the historical record, I think it's the other way around.

GUILFOYLE: Report the facts, then.

GUTFELD: The ratio is much higher for black and white, than white on black.

WILLIAMS: You know what? You're talking about I think in all honesty what you're talking about is poor people, and people who are more often in jail, and have criminal backgrounds, there's more likely to be black and Hispanic in this era.

GUILFOYLE: So, Bolling has the answer.

GUTFELD: Got to roll, Dana, I had a question for you.

PERINO: I'm good.

GUTFELD: You're good?

PERINO: Yes, it was a very interesting discussion, I was happy to listen.

GUTFELD: Oh, wow.

Eric, were you happy to listen? Would you like to add a comment?

BOLLING: No, I'm good.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: We're good.

GUTFELD: How is the guy on the street, K.G.? Tell me that. He's been in and out of jail.

GUILFOYLE: Why are you screaming?

GUTFELD: That drives me nuts.

GUILFOYLE: Right. He shouldn't be. The problem is it's a revolving door. You have people that are recidivists who aren't treated properly and appropriately in the criminal justice system.

They go back out, they reoffend and he's laughing, mocking the whole system, saying that he punched a cop, I did 168 hours, I was out, come on give me some more people to punch or spit on or whatever he does. He's a predator. He should be behind bars.

PERINO: There is a fund to help the mother and if people want to look that up, they could maybe give to her.

GUTFELD: Yes, we've got to find out if that fund is real.

PERINO: Oh, well, there should be a fund.

GUTFELD: There should be.

PERINO: You should administer it.

GUTFELD: I will.

All right. Coming up, how actor Tom Hanks managed to screw up a trial by just showing up for jury duty this week. I loved him in "Stripes." Wasn't he great, Dana?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WILLIAMS: Academy Award winner Tom Hanks reported for jury duty this week in Los Angeles. He was supposed to help decide a domestic violence case. But he ended up bringing it to a screeching halt instead. The defense alleged misconduct after a female prosecutor apparently got a little star struck and went to talk to Hanks during a break.

Here's attorney Andrew Flier describing what happened to TMZ.

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

ANDREW FLIER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: She made contact with Mr. Hanks in the stairwell of the building, and she came up to him and said that she thanked him and that how impressed everyone is that such a celebrity would still be here serving jury duty.

So, she in essence was maybe a little star struck and nice, but as I already heard, two minutes ago, it's an absolute 100 percent, no-no, and should never have happened.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIAMS: No, I mean, that comes down to, Kimberly, jury tampering.

So, this guy up for this domestic violence charge could have gone to jail for a year.

GUILFOYLE: Up for a year, yes.

WILLIAMS: Yes. And now, all of a sudden, he gets a fine of 150 bucks and is on the street.

GUILFOYLE: Well, they had to do that because when the allegation was made and in fact confirmed she went up to Tom Hanks, she didn't mean anything by it. This is part of the volunteer program at the city attorney's office. There have been criticisms over it because they don't have the experience to be handling this type of criminal cases, domestic violence, special, you know, victims involved. They need appropriate handling.

But that is a pretty basic thing. You do not go up and talk to the jurors. That would be a no-no in every way, shape or form.

Now, for example, in Manhattan, Tom Hanks wouldn't have to go to jury duty because if you sign up for jury appreciation day and go talk to people, do a special program, you don't have to actually go and serve because it causes a problem, it causes commotion, interference with the administration of justice is all I have to say.

BOLLING: What law school did you go to? Just out of law school.

WILLIAMS: Fresh out of law school.

Let me ask you, when you go on jury duty, do the lawyers take you?

BOLLING: Can I pass on that question?

WILLIAMS: Why?

BOLLING: Because I haven't been called for jury --

(LAUGHTER)

WILLIAMS: I get called for jury duty regularly and I'm going to tell you, though, the lawyers never take me. They say you're going to be too influential, you'll influence the jury.

GUILFOYLE: Because why?

WILLIAMS: They think I'm well known.

PERINO: Soft on crime.

WILLIAMS: No, no, those --

GUILFOYLE: Are you going to say you're big-time?

WILLIAMS: No.

BOLLING: Are you the Juan Williams?

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Are you @thejuanwilliams?

WILLIAMS: All right. All right. I give up.

What about you?

GUTFELD: I always thought jury duty was something you found in a courthouse bathroom.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Oh my --

GUTFELD: I -- the only time I went to jury duty that they dismissed me when they found out I worked at FOX News.

Yes, they said. The guy goes, I know you. It was, like, I was getting up to leave, he just said, don't come back. I just sat outside for a couple hours.

GUILFOYLE: Sold some copies of your book.

GUTFELD: Exactly.

PERINO: I served once on a jury, a domestic violence case actually and the lawyer, young prosecutor, she screwed up the case and he didn't get --

WILLIAMS: That's Kimberly's point. You should know what you're doing, especially in domestic violence.

GUILFOYLE: You really should. Yes. Domestic violence or child abuse.

WILLIAMS: All right. "One More Thing" up next. Hang with us.

GUILFOYLE: So dignified.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: It's time now for "One More Thing". Happy Friday.

All right. We're going to begin with Mr. Bolling.

BOLLING: Oh, thank you, Kimberly. So, if you read BuzzFeed, a great Web site, take a look what they put up today. Pull up the full screen if you don't mind.

Called Rand Paul on the warpath. It's written by McKay Coppins. It's a fantastic piece. It's a great interview with Rand Paul. BuzzFeed's McKay Coppins is a must read for those of you like, if you're like me, who are interested in new GOP changing guard, happening, folks.

I like the way these guys, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, I like the way they think.

PERINO: There's a cover story by Andrew Ferguson about Ted Cruz, too, this week. "Weekly Standard."

GUTFELD: There's a cover story in "Highlights" about how to make --

BOLLING: Matt Goofus.

GUTFELD: -- collages.

(LAUGHTER)

GUIFOYLE: All right. Dana?

PERINO: OK. So, yesterday was Greg's birthday and you all answered the call so well on Twitter. We appreciated it so much because we asked if you could send a picture of your dog for Greg's first birthday. So, we have one here. This is from DK87. Beautiful picture of the dog.

Then, Greg said, why don't you send a picture of a cat? This is a fan of the show, this is Pepper, the cat. That was sent to me. So, then, we upped the ante and said, what if you got a picture of the dog and cat together with a sunset?

And look at this. Shana Barnhart comes through.

But the very best was our old friend, we done know who he was, FIVE fan photo shop who does this mosaic of Craig's face and all made out of Jasper pictures.

GUILFOYLE: Oh --

GUTFELD: It's just creepy and wrong.

PERINO: I thought it was fabulous.

GUTFELD: That person must go to jail forever, in North Korea.

GUILFOYLE: You don't really mean that because I heard earlier, you thought you looked handsome in that.

GUTFELD: I always look handsome, Kimberly. That's not up for debate.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, I can't. I have to finish, as soon as I can leave.

Juan?

WILLIAMS: Well, this one is going to be an eye catcher. Miss Theresa Vail, Miss Kansas, was on stage in the bikini contest on Tuesday, I think, and revealed a tattoo. She has the entire Serenity Prayer going down her side and then she has the Army Medical Dental insignia on our shoulder blade.

This is the first time in Miss America history anybody has ever shown off their tattoo.

PERINO: Why do people get tattoos that they can't see?

WILLIAMS: That they can't see? It's supposed to be private. It's supposed to be for you and your lover.

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my God.

PERINO: If you get a tattoo back here, why do you have it?

WILLIAMS: Hold on, hold on. I just want to say that it's 24 years this year since one of our colleagues, Gretchen Carlson, won Miss America. And so congratulations to Gretchen.

PERINO: Congratulations.

WILLIAMS: Absolutely.

GUTFELD: She's got a tattoo?

WILLIAMS: I wish I could see her tattoo.

(LAUGHTER)

WILLIAMS: One other thing I wanted to say was --

GUILFOYLE: It must be that chair.

WILLIAMS: -- that Miss New York is now in a big fuss because she has called the current holder, Miss -- she called her a fat something. Let me just say that. She thought she's fat.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Not nice.

GUTFELD: I have a tattoo of a belly button on my back just to freak people out. And I walk backwards.

GUILFOYLE: By the way, yes, Juan, you have a particular, I guess, affection for Miss Americas or knowledge all about it. That was really interesting.

OK. I can't hear anything from the control room. So I have no idea. We're out of time.

But, my ear piece went out. Can we talk about the royals just to make Greg mad?

GUTFELD: Yes.

GUILFOYLE: So, Prince Williams is going to swap armed forces duty for royal duties. He served faithfully. It was his find shift as an RAF search and rescue pilot on Tuesday. He's going to focus on his charity work and, of course, adorable Prince George.

OK. That's it for us "Five." Thanks for watching. Have a great weekend.

"Special Report" is next.

Content and Programming Copyright 2013 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2013 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.