Krauthammer: “The storyline now is that the President was wrong”

Charles Krauthammer told viewers Monday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that when it comes to President Trump’s allegations via Twitter about wiretapping by President Obama, “the storyline now is that the President was wrong.”

His comments come after FBI Director James Comey and NSA Chief Michael Rogers testified before the House Intelligence Committee today regarding Russian interference in the 2016 election. Comey said he has “no information to support” Trump’s wiretapping allegations.

“His own FBI director is saying it and speaking on behalf of all the Department of Justice which is Trump’s own department of Justice which makes Spicer look ridiculous,” Krauthammer said. “Because it’s his own department saying the president is wrong. But that’s the price of doing this kind of tweeting.”

Schumer on Trump 2005 tax return: ‘Where’s he getting this money from?’

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer said Wednesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that the leaked release of a document from President Trump’s 2005 tax return is wholly insufficient to answering questions about the president’s business interests.

“It’s two pages of one year. What happened over ten years? There might have been a year he was good,” he said, “But much more importantly, where’s he getting all this money from? The key question here is are there Russian sources, and might those have affected or will affect President Trump?”

Schumer went on to say that Trump’s behavior toward Russian president Vladimir Putin has been “much softer” than that of other Republican politicians.

“The question is why? When he makes a deal with Russia, whatever it is, you don’t want anyone suspecting it’s done because he has hotels there,” he said.  

Ingraham: White House trying to salvage GOP healthcare proposal

Laura Ingraham said on “Special Report with Bret Baier” Tuesday she thinks President Donald Trump is not fully behind the Republican plan to revise the Affordable Care Act since the bill is not “popular” among conservatives and moderates alike.

“I think he’s given orders to fix this if possible,” Ingraham argued. “The fact that he doesn’t want his name on this from the very beginning… he’s a brand guy and if this brand is going down he doesn’t want to be tagged with it, and that’s why you see the shift over to this is going to be Ryan’s game to fix or to start over.”

In an intensive effort, the White House is trying to salvage support for the GOP plan a day after the Congressional Budget Office released its analysis showing 14 million fewer Americans would be insured next year under the GOP plan.

“He [Vice President Pence] is making the rounds in conservative media and it’s not popular and I think Donald Trump wants this to be popular and I don’t blame him,” added Ingraham. “I think he’s seeing the threads are slowly coming unraveled.”

Hemingway: CBO estimates “notoriously bad”

Mollie Hemingway told viewers Monday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that new figures about the American Health Care Act come from an office that is “notoriously bad” when it comes to such estimates.

Earlier, the Congressional Budget Office released its estimate that the GOP health care plan would decrease the budget deficit by $337 billion over a 10 year period. It also estimated that under the plan, 14 million people would lose health care coverage next year – a number that would grow to 24 million people in the next decade.

Hemingway cited previous examples of CBO problems.

“Think back to 2010 when they said that under Obamacare you would have 23 million Americans insured. It is actually 12 million this year,” she said. “They also made a forecasting error so they dramatically underestimated the cost of Medicaid. So we need to keep these things in mind as we are talking about this scoring as well.”

 

The CBO Scores the Republican Obamacare Replacement Plan

By Jake Smith

The Congressional Budget Office released their score of the GOP replacement for the Affordable Care Act – also known as Obamacare – the Republican placement is called the American Health Care Act.

The CBO projects the AHCA will reduce the federal deficits by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 period. The CBO writes “the largest savings would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the elimination of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) subsidies for nongroup health insurance.”

The Republican replacement would increase the number of uninsured people by 14 million by 2018 and 24 million by 2026 – “an estimated 52 million people would be uninsured, compared with 28 million who would lack insurance that year under current law” – according to the new report.

Under the Republican’s American Health Care Act, by 2026 “premiums in the nongroup market would be 20 percent to 25 percent lower for a 21-year-old and 8 percent to 10 percent lower for a 40-year-old – but 20 percent to 25 percent higher for a 64-year old.”

The average premiums for single policyholders would also increase by 15 percent to 20 percent due to the elimination of the individual mandate penalties.

Additionally, the CBO estimates an 18 percent increase in premiums under the new GOP healthcare bill.

The Congressional Budget Office’s new score projects a reduction in the deficit, but this new score will be tough to sell to conservative Republicans and Democrats because of the increase in uninsured and rising premiums.

(Video above from Bret Baier's interview with House Speaker Paul Ryan following release of CBO report)

Laura Ingraham on Replacing Obamacare: "It's a bum's rush to push this thing through"

Conservative Author, Laura Ingraham said Thursday on "Special Report with Bret Baier" that many conservatives like Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas want the Health Care Replacement to be done right.  "Tom Cotton says why the rush, you kind of get the sense it's a bum's rush to push this thing through as fast as they are."

Ingraham said most conservatives just want "get this right and really do it right."  She continued by saying "the longer this thing goes on the harder it's going to be for them to pass it."

President Donald Trump promised to repeal and replace Obamacare when he got in office but Ingraham said that as it stands now many conservatives think it doesn't bring costs down and for fiscal conservatives "this doesn't do it for them."

 

Krauthammer: Defense spending increase ‘may not be enough’

On “Special Report with Bret Baier” Monday, Syndicated Columnist Charles Krauthammer told viewers the boost in defense spending as part of President Trump’s budget proposal “may not be enough.”

“Eight years ago, defense spending was at 4.6 percent of GDP. Today it's 3.2 percent,” said Krauthammer. “That is a catastrophic collapse.”

The Administration announced the Defense Department would receive an additional $54 billion dollars. During a National Governors Association meeting at the White House, Trump said the increase would be offset by other savings across the federal government.

Krauthammer called this proposal just a beginning of what is needed to rebuild military spending.

“We are in dire need with Russia, China and Iran rising of correcting that. This is a beginning of a down payment on what's really needed,” said Krauthammer.

Krauthammer on Congress: ‘It can’t get its act together’

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Wednesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that while many Americans are hoping the Republican-led Congress will tackle big ticket items like tax reform and health care this year, legislators in Washington seem incapable of acting on their own. 
 
“Here we have united government, or at least same party controlling everything, with a lot of momentum… And the great irony is that Congress has become so dependent on following the lead of a president, in general, [it is] allowing its powers to be usurped,” he said, adding, “One presidency after another, this is not the product of one party. But it's simply, now that it's in control, [Congress] can't get its act together.”
 
Instead, Krauthammer said lawmakers will continue to look to the White House for guidance.
 
“Unless you get strong presidential leadership, the president, say, next week in his quasi-State of the Union address saying this is what I want on tax reform and leading on it, that would be the decisive event,” he said, concluding, “In the absence of that, it's showing how, sort of, weak Congress has become, and how it's become habituated to looking to the White House for leadership. It's not getting it, it's not going anywhere.”
 

Riley on May press conference: “This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump.”

The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley told viewers Friday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that President Donald Trump “was in fine form” at his first press conference as president today.

“This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump,” Riley said.

The press conference was a joint appearance with visiting British Prime Minister Theresa May. Riley noted that Trump took a more measured tone than usual.

“He was careful with his words. Very measured even when he got a couple of aggressive questions from some foreign media outlets,” commented Riley, adding, “I think we’ll have to see more of this if he wants a successful presidency but today I think he got the job done.”

Krauthammer on Schumer pronouncement America can’t afford a Twitter presidency: “Sore loser”

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that new Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s pronouncement that America “can’t afford a Twitter presidency” is mostly baseless.

“Sore loser,” Krauthammer said. “The tweets are working. I mean, if they weren’t, they wouldn’t be using them… Trump has used [Twitter] on North Korea, he’s used it on Ford, General Motors… and it works.”

Krauthammer went on to say that while Twitter has proven to be an effective mode of communication for the President-elect, Trump may not find it as useful after he is sworn in as president.

“I think when he's in office, it'll be a little more problematic, because people will be presuming policy out of this,” he said, concluding, “It's hard to be either detailed or specific enough in a tweet to actually make coherent policy.”

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  • Mollie Hemingway @MZHemingway
  • AB Stoddard @RealClearNews
  • Charles Krauthammer @krauthammer

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