• With: Bob Costas

    COSTAS: I get it.

    (CROSSTALK)

    O'REILLY: I'm not scolding, I was trying to --.

    COSTAS: That's a mild scolding compared what I've --

    O'REILLY: Yes, I mean -- ok.

    COSTAS: -- received over the last 72 hours.

    O'REILLY: As long as you call a Christmas tree a Christmas tree, you're ok here.

    COSTAS: Yes. Merry Christmas to you, too, Bill.

    O'REILLY: All right. There you go.

    So let's advance the story a little bit. Gun control in America is an emotional issue because it is clear that the founding fathers gave the right to bear arms for two reasons -- two reasons. Number one, because they felt that the government might devolve into tyranny and the second thing was the -- the founding fathers knew that they had to settle this giant country and there weren't going to be laws out in the West and people had to have guns to protect themselves from bears and -- and native Americans that didn't like them --

    (CROSSTALK)

    COSTAS: Yes. Yes.

    O'REILLY: -- coming on their property. So there's a history here --

    COSTAS: Yes.

    O'REILLY: -- all right? And most people don't even understand that history.

    So Americans grow up with the right to protect themselves -- against the government and against bad people. Then you enter into the modern age, where you have a debate about well, what's the government's responsibility here, because these are lethal weapons?

    And that's where you come in, right? So you're saying that you want a more stringent program by the authorities to make it harder to get guns --

    COSTAS: It sounds like you're -- you're -- you are saying I'm saying that. Now if you --

    (CROSSTALK)

    O'REILLY: You're not saying that?

    (CROSSTALK)

    COSTAS: -- if you -- if you were to ask me --

    O'REILLY: You want -- you don't want to make --

    (CROSSTALK)

    COSTAS: -- if you were to ask me --

    (CROSSTALK)

    O'REILLY: -- it harder to get guns?

    COSTAS: -- I believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns.

    O'REILLY: So what does that mean?

    COSTAS: Well, what -- that's -- but that is not where I was coming from --

    (CROSSTALK)

    O'REILLY: I know. But what does that mean, though? I'm curious.

    (CROSSTALK)

    COSTAS: -- on Sunday night.

    O'REILLY: I'm curious. What -- how -- how do you do that?

    COSTAS: Roughly 40 percent of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchase.

    O'REILLY: Ok. So you want a background check, right?

    COSTAS: You -- you have that. You've talked about stricter penalties, harsher penalties for those --

    O'REILLY: For criminals.

    COSTAS: Exactly.