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    This is a rush transcript from "On the Record," April 7, 2011. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, FOX NEWS HOST: Well, our next guest says we should want a government shutdown. Well, he certainly needs to explain that one himself. I can't. Former adviser to President Clinton and author of the new book "Revolt," Dick Morris joins us. Dick, why should anyone want a shutdown?

    DICK MORRIS, "REVOLT" AUTHOR: Well, I don't want a shutdown. I want a cut of $61 billion. I want the Republicans in Congress to keep the campaign commitment they made to the American people of a $100 billion cut. And I'm shocked at your interview with Congresswoman Bachmann. She was saying, Oh, there's going to be a deal, they'll come together, there'll be some kind of compromise. Well, a compromise that is less than $61 billion is breaking the promise to the American people. And above all...

    VAN SUSTEREN: Now, you think...

    (CROSSTALK)

    MORRIS: ... that the Republicans are so -- the Republicans are so scared...

    VAN SUSTEREN: You think...

    MORRIS: ... about the -- let me finish. The Republicans are so scared of a government shutdown that they're not willing to stand firm on their principles and keep their promises. I believe the Republicans would win a government shutdown. The issue in the rest of the country would be more spending versus less spending. We know how that's going to come out.

    And I would urge every freshman and every member of Congress to vote against anything that is less than the full $61 billion and to be honest with the American people and keep the promises on which you were elected. It's not such a strange point of view to say you made a promise, you ought to keep that promise. And if Speaker Boehner is willing to lead the way in breaking that promise, I think it's time he become former Speaker Boehner.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Is there any way -- I mean, the $61 billion is enormous amount of money. However, it is less than 2 percent of the budget at the same time. It's not -- I mean, in some ways...

    MORRIS: Right.

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... it's an enormous amount of money. In some ways, it's absolutely chump change. Is it worth it if they are close enough on the money issue -- is it worth it to shut down the government and run -- I mean, and create all sorts of problems for the American people?

    MORRIS: Sure. Sure, it is.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Although I must tell you -- I must tell you, I'm not particularly sympathetic that we've even gotten to this point because I assign the blame to the House, the Senate and the president that we're even in this ridiculous race against the clock.

    MORRIS: Oh, I don't think it's ridiculous. I think it's very good. I think that the race against the clock is because the administration is taking the ridiculous position that in a budget of $3.6 trillion, they can't find $61 billion of waste to cut. And the Republicans are taking the ludicrous position that they're going to accept a cut of a lesser order of magnitude, of such a tiny sum relative to the budget.

    The reason this is important is if the Republicans do not get what they want, it will be because they're afraid of a shutdown. And if they are afraid of a shutdown, they will be forced to compromise on debt limit, on the budget, and they will accomplish nothing during their tenure in Congress because the only weapon they have is a shutdown. And if they're not willing to use that weapon, that cowardice is going to undermine their ability to keep their commitments.

    And my view is that the government shutdown will not be so bad. I think troops need to be paid. We have to make sure the Democrats don't hold them hostage and the Republican bill that pays the troops passes. Obama, the Commander-in-Chief, is willing to hold America's troops hostage and have them not paid.

    VAN SUSTEREN: You say that it's not so bad for the American people if there's a shutdown. Why do all the members of...

    MORRIS: No.

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... Congress think it's a bad idea?

    MORRIS: Social Security -- Social Security...

    VAN SUSTEREN: Why -- why does everyone else think it's a bad idea...

    MORRIS: Well, part of it is...

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... OK, who's the representatives...

    MORRIS: Part of it...

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... and the senators?

    MORRIS: Part of it -- can I answer your question? Part of it is that they're all in Washington and there are 800,000 federal workers there who aren't going to get paychecks for a few days or for a week or two. And they're all reflecting this hothouse atmosphere within the Beltway. In the rest of America, we don't want a shutdown. We want the campaign commitment to be kept without a shutdown, but if it takes a shutdown to make it kept, we don't think that's a bad thing. We think it's important that government keep that, that the Republicans keep that commitment.

    And if we don't shut it down now, when are we going to shut it down? Over the debt limit? Over the federal budget? The Republicans will essentially vitiate the whole impact of the 2010 election if they cave in on this one, and Boehner shows every...

    VAN SUSTEREN: You know, because I...

    MORRIS: ... every sign of caving in.

    VAN SUSTEREN: I wouldn't make the argument of the 800,000 if I were the president because I travel the country a lot, and there are a lot people who say, 800,000 federal workers, at least they have their jobs. I mean, those jobs are pretty much safe. So actually, I always -- I always think every time I hear the 800,000 federal workers, I think, Not that one, don't use that argument. There are -- there are better ones in terms of how it affects the American people. But anyway, we'll see...

    MORRIS: Right.

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... what happens and...

    MORRIS: But the better one, Greta...

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... let's see, 26 hours or less.

    MORRIS: The better one, Greta, is let them -- let the -- let John Boehner keep his word. It's that simple. And will the Republican freshmen keep their word? And will the Republican congressmen keep their word? Or are they -- were they lying us to when they said $100 billion?

    VAN SUSTEREN: Dick, I got to go.

    MORRIS: Now, if they fought it and they lost it, that's OK. But they're not fighting it.