• With: Herman Cain

    CAIN: I enjoy flowers, like everybody else.

    VAN SUSTEREN: You know what I mean.

    (LAUGHTER)

    CAIN: No. No, not at all.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Not at all.

    CAIN: Well, I wouldn't say not at all. Depends upon what you mean and (INAUDIBLE) to what you mean.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Well, I'm trying to -- you know, women see sexual harassment sometimes very differently than men.

    CAIN: Correct.

    VAN SUSTEREN: And you don't recall exactly, and maybe it didn't occur, you know, maybe there was no conversation -- I mean, women -- look, women can make it up and they can be telling the truth.

    CAIN: Right.

    VAN SUSTEREN: And it's always -- and it's always just two people alone and it's sort of hard to tell. And so I'm trying to get a sense of whether or not you're one of those guys that's a little too friendly and a little too cozy when you're, you know, with a co-worker.

    CAIN: Here's what I can tell you.

    VAN SUSTEREN: OK.

    CAIN: I know I never made any innuendoes with the lady that filed the complaint that we were talking about at first. None.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Zero?

    CAIN: Zero. Zero. None.

    VAN SUSTEREN: And the other woman, whose name you remember? Ever anything -- nothing with her?

    CAIN: No. I recall that there were times when some of the members of the staff would go out for Friday evening, you know, cocktails or appetizers and this sort of thing, and so typically, it could have been a group of us. She was in some of those group activities where we went out together. But it was never she and I alone or anything like that. The first one that you talked about, she never was in any of those kind of, you know, after-hour activities.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Are you one of those guys in a group who can say sort of dopey things that women can later -- you know, often, when they go into the ladies' room, they talk about the guys, they say, Did you hear what Mr. Cain said or what Herman Cain said? Are you, like, one of those guys who says sort of dopey, inappropriate things in groups?

    CAIN: No. The only thing that I could be guilty of saying in a group of men and women is paying a compliment to the woman. For example, if I'm with friends and I'm there and my wife is there, I might compliment my friend on, you know, how lucky he is to, you know, have married up because some men marry up, and you know, those kind of compliments, just complimenting somebody else.

    So I would, you know, say that about, or I would, you know, pay a lady a compliment. If she changed her hair, you know, I might say something like, Oh, you changed your hairstyle. It's very becoming. So I would make compliments to women in group settings like that, sure.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Is there any chance more women are going to -- you know, or more accusations come out of the woodwork? Because that's the thing that's -- you know, is most painful in all these sort of...

    CAIN: Right.

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... candidates or -- is that all of a sudden, you say, No, there are no -- and then the next day, someone else shows up. And then all of a sudden, you look like a big liar, not to mention a big sexual harasser. Is there anything else out there or should we -- that we can lay on the table now?

    CAIN: To my knowledge, Greta, no. Remember, I -- there wasn't even an inkling of a sexual harassment charge in all of the other jobs that I had, all the way up until the time that I worked for the National Restaurant Association. To my knowledge, no.

    Is it possible that someone is going to make something up? Yes. But is it going to be credible in terms of there was an actual sexual harassment case filed? No, because I would have known about it. If someone is going to step forward and say that I made some inappropriate comments or acted inappropriately that they could call sexual harassment, even though they didn't file a formal complaint -- not to my knowledge.

    But remember, people can still make stuff up. But I have absolutely no doubt in my mind that there's no other credible ones out there that could actually show up and, OK, here we go again. You won't get a "Here we go again" because there isn't anything.

    VAN SUSTEREN: You know, it took -- I think that Politico says that they contacted your staff about the 20th of October and it took several days to get an answer. So you know, that fuels lots of suspicion.

    CAIN: Right.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Why did it take what seems like to us several days? It may not seem that way to you. But what took so long?

    CAIN: We made a conscious decision they my staff person brought it to my attention that since these were two anonymous claims, that we did not want to legitimize two anonymous claims until Politico felt that they were ready to go public with this. That's why. Why chase anonymous?

    Secondly, we weren't even aware of what the article was going to say. We didn't know what we were going to have to defend. So why defend something before you know what it is that you have to defend? And I'm glad that we waited because they quoted three board members who basically confirmed my character and my integrity. That's why we waited.

    (END VIDEOTAPE)