• With: Joe Rago, Bret Stephens, Kim Strassel, Mary Anastasia O'Grady, Dorothy Rabinowitz

    STRASSEL: I mean, the other issue here, though, is the environmentalists tend to focus on environmental risk of these different ways of transporting oil. There is the human risk, which is what we saw evidenced in Canada this week. The reality is that train tracks are designed to go through population centers. Pipelines, by contrast, don't tend to be that. So when you have leaks or spills, you are not putting humans at such huge risk as you are as when you are transporting massive amounts of combustible fuel through population centers where people can die.

    GIGOT: Is this going to have any influence, Kim, on President Obama's decision, do you think? Or is it -- is he --

    (CROSSTALK)

    STRASSEL: I think we are beyond --

    (LAUGHTER)

    -- knowing what is influencing President Obama's decision here.

    (LAUGHTER)

    He gave this speech on climate a few weeks back and he seemed to lay out a new standard, saying that, you know, Keystone added to the climate change, he wouldn't approve that. That's a very fuzzy standard because of the ways you can measure things like that. It didn't really give any further indication of which way he's going. He seems to be putting this off as long as he can.

    GIGOT: I will admit I have been the foolish optimist on Keystone thinking the best of the president, thinking he would approve. And I think you folks have been more skeptical.

    (LAUGHTER)

    O'GRADY: Well, not only that -- Kim knows this also -- that the Keystone Pipeline is a huge fundraiser for the president and for environmental groups. That, I think, will answer your question.

    STEPHENS: Environmentalists treat Keystone as a kind of religious totem. And we are having two separate conversations. They should be talking about what is the safest, most environmentally sound way to move crude, because that crude will be moved.

    GIGOT: All right.

    When we come back, first it was Anthony Weiner. Now Eliot Spitzer attempts his own political comeback. Is there something in the New York water? And do these politicians deserve a second chance? Our own Dorothy Rabinowitz weights in next.

    (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

    GIGOT: A surprise announcement from former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer, who five years after resigning office amid a prostitution scandal, said he'll ask voters for forgiveness and seek the job of New York City comptroller. So far, voters appear willing to give him a second chance with a brand-new poll showing him leading his Democratic challenger.

    He is not the only Democrat seeking redemption. In the Big Apple's September primary, former congressman, Anthony Weiner, who resigned in 2011 after a sexting scandal, is running for New York City mayor, and has emerged as a serious contender.

    Wall Street Journal editorial board member, Dorothy Rabinowitz, joins with us more.

    So, Dorothy, how do explain these comebacks?

    DOROTHY RABINOWITZ, EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER: These comebacks come because Americans have long had this tendency to fall into fits of virtue. This virtue is everybody gets a second chance.

    (LAUGHTER)

    Let me tell you, the most memorable thing that happened this week was Anthony Weiner, in debate with a congressman, at a senior citizen center, and he was attacked and then the attacker said to the audience, "And of course, he lied about the sexting," at which point all of these elderly people were about to choke him.

    (LAUGHTER)

    They thought they would die.

    (LAUGHTER)

    Paul, it will not be long before mentioning Anthony Weiner's past would be equal to be called McCarthyism.

    (LAUGHTER)

    GIGOT: Am I inferring that you don't think that they deserve a second chance?

    RABINOWITZ: Well --

    (LAUGHTER)

    Well, let's say that I don't think that it is interesting to watch this display.

    The point is it does tell so much more about the electorate to know they have been driven off into these parallaxes into virtue over giving someone a second chance. And it says a lot about -- may I use the word "narcissism". It -- (INAUDIBLE).

    GIGOT: You may use that word, yes.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (CROSSTALK)

    GIGOT: Mary.

    O'GRADY: You know, the thing that bothers me the most about this is that it is not clear to me that any of them deserve redemption. The process, as we Catholics know, is that there has to be contrition --

    (LAUGHTER)

    -- and there has to be an acceptance of what you did.

    (LAUGHTER)