• From man's beginnings as recorded in the book of Genesis, we were hard-wired for work. We were told by God that we would earn our bread by the sweat of our brow. It is natural for us to want to prove our value by producing. From the time we are children, we imitate our parents in their work. Whether it's the little boy who tries to take tools to fix something, or the little girl who begs to help her mother in the kitchen, it's just part of our DNA to want to be grown up and one sure way to feel grown up is to work.

    That's why the loss of a job is far, far more than just an economic setback for a human being. It's de-humanizing to want to be productive and not be able to acquire meaningful labor. There is pride, there's dignity in being able to sit at the table and eat a meal that your work provided. But in our current economy, a record number of Americans are either unemployed or underemployed, meaning that the job they have is either part-time or it pays less than what is required to meet basic necessities.

    In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on the suicide rate from 1928 to all the way to 2007. Suicide rates mirrored the economy in the ups and downs, with a big uptick when the Great Depression began and hitting a zenith in 1933. Suicide rates plunged during World War II, and then they spiked again in the recessions of the mid-70's and early 80's, peaking a few years after unemployment hit its post-war peak in 1982. Suicides dropped to their lowest levels ever in the year 2000, when technology was on fire. Unemployment was at a stunning 4 percent at the time. But as the dot-com balloon burst, America's suicide rate has been steadily climbing. All that is a stark reminder that the job issue is an economic issue, but it's a lot more than that. It is an issue that gets to the very soul of our culture and its people.

    Joblessness results in either people giving up in despair or rising up in defiance.

    Of course both parties claim to be all about jobs.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    REP. JOHN BOEHNER, R - OH, SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE: As you know, House Republicans have been focused on economic growth and jobs since day one.

    VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: A three letter word -- jobs. J-O-B-S. Jobs.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    Thank you Joe.

    But the truth is, jobs aren't created so much when the government does something as they are when the government stops doing things that put an anchor instead of a life vest around the necks of entrepreneurs. We hear a lot about values, but do we value the work and the people who do it? If so, we ought to pay them as if we do value them and their work. Companies ought to pay employees as generously as they can because good workers have worth. Now, if the employer keeps too much for himself, he or she doesn't really value the worker.

    And by the way, the reason that high taxes are bad is because it's a sign that the government disrespects the worker by believing that what it's going to do with the salary is better than what the person who earned will do. But when we see employees as having worth, we will see their work as having value. That's the value of work.

    Now, I believe you are valuable and therefore what you do has value. The president spent some time pushing some job-killing ObamaCare, money-wasting crony capital investment boondoggles like Solyndra, and then side show issues like free birth control, same-sex marriage, and late-term abortion.

    Joe Biden might not be able to count to four, but he's at least right about what we ought to be focused on -

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: A three letter word -- jobs. J-O-B-S. Jobs.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)