• With: Judy Miller, Cal Thomas, Jim Pinkerton, Kirsten Powers

    Up next, did the media interfere in a massive manhunt?

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    A major manhunt for a rogue ex-cop gets major media attention. Did the press get too close to the action? And did some in the media side with the killer? Details next on "News Watch."

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    DR. BENJAMIN CARSON, JOHNS HOPKINS NEUROSURGEON: You make $10 billion, you put in a billion. You make $10 you put in 1. Of course you've got to get rid of the loopholes ...

    (APPLAUSE)

    CARSON: ... but ...

    (APPLAUSE)

    CARSON: Now, now, some people say, they say, well, that's not fair, because it doesn't hurt the guy who made $10 billion as much as the guy who made ten. Where does it say you have to hurt the guy? He just put a billion dollars in the pot. You know, we don't need to hurt him.

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    SCOTT: Renowned pediatric neurosurgeon Ben Carson delivering a speech at last week's National Prayer Breakfast. It was critical of President Obama's policies of taxing the highest income earners, government spending and Obamacare as well. Cal, you were not impressed with what he had to

    say there?

    THOMAS: Well, I was impressed by what he had to say, I just think it was the wrong venue to say it. It's like going to church and getting a book report. That's not why you go.

    (LAUGHTER)

    THOMAS: This is -- I've been a part of this for, I don't know, 40 years or so, and speakers are supposed to talk about a higher king and a different kingdom, not lecture a president on his policies and it would have been just as inappropriate if he had praised the president or if a Republican president had been criticized by a Democrat. That's not the format.

    SCOTT: On CNN, Candy Crowley had a panel discussion and asked her panelists if they were offended by those remarks from Dr. Carson. Was it offensive?

    PINKERTON: Look I -- first of all, I completely agree with his right to say it. And I admire Cal for writing a really gutsy column and Kirsten who was tweeting on it. It was well, on his behalf. He's got a right to say it. It's an inappropriate venue and I don't know if CNN should be offended or not, but it was damaging to this wonderful national bipartisan, non-partisan institution of the National Prayer Breakfast that everybody should feel welcome to and not think that they're going to get a political lecture, enough of those in Washington everywhere else.

    SCOTT: As a matter of fact, the president took the opportunity at the same event to lecture, or at least not at the event, but to talk about cable news. Let's listen.

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    OBAMA: I do worry sometimes that as soon as we leave the prayer breakfast everything we have been talking about, the whole time at the prayer breakfast seems to be forgotten. On the same day of the prayer breakfast.

    (LAUGHTER)

    OBAMA: I mean, you'd like to think that the shelf life wasn't so short.

    (LAUGHTER)

    OBAMA: But I go back to the Oval Office and I start watching the cable news networks and it's like we didn't pray.

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    SCOTT: So, what about that? I mean, people are saying that the good doctor should not have been, you know, talking politics, but the president's kind of talking politics there, isn't he?

    MILLER: No, what the president was doing, was saying exactly what Cal has been saying in his column and Jim just said and Kirsten just said. There's a time and a place for everything and can't we just for a moment remember those things at an event like this that bring us together as Americans rather than those that divide us, which we get every other minute of every day in Washington and New York and the rest of the country?

    SCOTT: All right. Let's move on to a story which was breaking, leading up to the State of the Union on Tuesday. The largest manhunt in LAPD history came to a dramatic end when Christopher Dorner, a former police officer wanted for killing three people, died in a cabin in Big Bear, California the media went full-tilt on the coverage, including this, from Columbia University professor Dr. Marc Lamont Hill on CNN.

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    MARC LAMONT HILL, HUFFINGTON POST LIVE HOST: And as far as Dorner himself goes, he's been like a real life super hero for many people. Now, don't get me wrong, what he did was awful, killing innocent people is bad, but when you read his manifesto, when you read the message that he left, he wasn't entirely crazy, he had a plan and a mission here. And many people aren't rooting for him to kill innocent people, they are rooting for somebody who was wrong to get a kind of revenge against the system. It's almost like watching "Django Unchained" in real life, it's kind of exciting.

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    SCOTT: What about that?

    (LAUGHTER)

    SCOTT: I mean there are people who were you know, executed at the hands of this guy. I mean a young woman and her fiance shot to death in a car and

    this guy is all excited because it's "Django Unchained"?

    POWERS: I don't understand that, because I actually really usually like to listen to what Marc Lamont Hill has to say. So, I don't know why he would even say something like that. Honestly. I mean I'm just at a complete loss.

    THOMAS: I'm still reading Ted Kaczynski's manifesto. That was a high point of my life.

    POWERS: And I don't know what was in this manifesto that was so great, either.

    PINKERTON: Well, as Greg Pollowitz of National Review and Noah Rothman of Mediaite both pointed out, because the manifesto was sort of more left wing and crazy as opposed to right wing and crazy, the media weren't interested in it. If it had been some Tea Party saying, well, here is why I have to shoot cops because (inaudible) Washington Post told me to, that would have been a front page in The New York Times, and instead, as Pollowitz and Rothman pointed out, it disappeared.