• With: Judy Miller, Cal Thomas, Jim Pinkerton, Kirsten Powers

    This is a rush transcript from "Fox News Watch," September 29, 2012. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

    RICK FOLBAUM, GUEST HOST: On Fox "News Watch." The president talks foreign policy on "60 Minutes."

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    PRESIDENT OBAMA: There are going to be bumps on the road.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    FOLBAUM: The media missed that. Then, auto shmooz with the gals on "The View."

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    OBAMA: I'm just supposed to be eye candy here for you today.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    FOLBAUM: Would the press pass on this too?

    Mr. Obama takes center stage at the U.N.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    OBAMA: Here in the United States countless publications provoke offense. I expect that people are going to call me awful things every day. And I will always defend their right to do so.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    FOLBAUM: How did the media treat his message? And how did the news media react to the words and warnings from other world leaders? CNN reveals details from an ambassador's private journal and ignites bitter reaction in a debate over what is fair game. New details surface about the deadly terror attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya. Reports about what the White House knew and when they knew it and the press passes again. Stumbles, fumbles and grumbles as replacement refs get replaced by the real deal officials. How do the media force to play? And some in conservative press gather at a star-studded gala.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I never did much understand why CNN thought it would beat Fox News at 9:00 p.m. With a British host who looks like he just got a really bad wedgy at a British prep school.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    FOLBAUM: On the panel this week, writer and Fox News contributor, Judy Miller, syndicated columnist Cal Thomas, Jim Pinkerton, contributing editor of the American Conservative Magazine and Daily Beast columnist Kirsten Powers. I'm Rick Folbaum in for Jon Scott; "Fox News Watch" is on right now.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    STEVE KROFT, CBS ANCHOR: Have recent events in the Middle East given you any pause about your support for the governments that have come to power following the Arab Spring?

    OBAMA: Well, I said even at the time that this is going to be a rocky path. The question presumes that somehow we could have stopped this wave of change. I think it was absolutely the right thing for us to do to align ourselves with democracy, universal rights, a notion that people have to be able to participate in their own governance, but I was pretty certain and continue to be pretty certain that there are going to be bumps in the road, because, you know, in a lot of these places, the one organizing principle has been Islam.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    FOLBAUM: President Obama on "60 Minutes" last Sunday and interview with numerous remarks about the Cairo embassy attack and Israel is bump in the road comments ignored by most in the mainstream media and Cal, is -- Steve Kroft had a follow-up to that comment? CBS didn't air it.

    CAL THOMAS, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: Exactly right. They never follow up with the president. The fundamental flaw in the media's thinking as exhibited by Steve Kroft is when the president says, well, the organizing principle is Islam. Mr. President, it's not just Islam, it's the extremist wing of Islam and name me a country other than Indonesia and maybe Turkey, though we don't know exactly where that is going where this fundamentalist Islam has been nonviolent, has promoted the equality of women or any of the other things. This is a fool's errand in the editorials in the newspapers; they all missed this because they don't have a religious perspective.

    FOLBAUM: Judy, the death -- the assassination of our ambassador, of two former SEALs, of the State Department employee, bumps in the road. Where was the criticism over that comment?

    JUDY MILLER, WRITER & FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR: Well, I think what the president was talking about was the broader context of the wave of change, and that in the wave of change there are going to be bumps on the road. He -- I don't -- do nothing that he meant to suggest, and most people didn't interpret it to mean that the death of four American officials is a bump in the road. But that being said there was so much in that "60 Minutes" interview. For example his calling Bibi Netanyahu's insistence on a red line noise. I mean there was so much that should have been -- could have been followed up on and wasn't. I'm really surprised.

    FOLBAUM: Jim, when Governor Romney delivered his initial response after the attack on a consulate in Benghazi he was ganged up on by the media. They coordinated their questions in that press conference the day after and yet after the "60 Minutes" interview, nothing.

    JIM PINKERTON, THE AMERICAN CONSERVATIVE MAGAZINE: Right. A few words from Governor Romney than you'd probably wish he could take back a little bit, where a weeks for the news, when it was that Libya statement. The bumps in the road comment went by pretty much unnoticed. Which takes me back, though, to another occasion where a U.S. president dealing with the tragedy in the Middle East used a sort of awkward metaphor. And that was President Reagan in the wake of the Beirut bombing in 1983 when all the Marines were killed in the barracks. The president made some statement, sort of like, well, you know, it takes time to fix your kitchen. You know, it was an awkward statement, he was not anyway minimizing the death of all those Marines, just like President Obama wasn't minimizing the death of those four diplomats, but back then, it was a week's news of how terrible President Reagan is obviously out of it. You know, (inaudible) on and on. Whereas with President Obama, when right pass, meanwhile, big news coming out of, you know, this whole thing, Mohammed Morsi in Egypt saying that insults to the prophet are "unacceptable," and then sort of siding with the bad guys there, and that, of course, doesn't -- that is a bump on the road. Going forward.

    (LAUGHTER)

    MILLER: That's right.

    FOLBAUM: Kirsten, selective outrage on the part of media

    KIRSTEN POWERS, DAILY BEAST COLUMNIST & USA TODAY CONTRIBUTOR: Yeah, well, definitely selective outrage. And in this case just zero outrage of so many things that are outrageous. You know, I mean I guess most of outrage we've seen, this has been over the YouTube video that the administration has sort of elevated to a movie. It's not a movie. It's just a YouTube video that nobody ever saw. In fact, they are buying into this sort of Islamist line that there was a movie that somehow all these people saw. So, I also just disagree even with the idea of the president saying it's a bump in the road because it makes this sound very -- almost minor. And what is going on, it's not minor having 20 different countries having anti- American uprisings in addition to having four Americans killed is much more than a bump in the road.

    FOLBAUM: So then the president comes to New York, he is about to give his speech to the United Nations. In the years past presidents have had one on one meetings with other world leaders. Instead this president decided to go on the view. Take a look.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What is more challenging? Coaching up the girls on the court or trying to get everybody in Congress to get on the same page?

    OBAMA: The no contest.

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK.

    OBAMA: The girls, you know, they play like a team.