• With: Judy Miller, Jim Pinkerton, Juan Williams, Richard Grenell

    SCOTT: All right.

    PINKERTON: Speaking of recordings, they caught President Obama on a hot mic saying, look, I have to deal with Netanyahu all the time. And I don't like it. I think it was to Sarkozy. I mean -- it's pretty clear from everything that you catch Obama on an off moment saying he doesn't -- not at all a fan of Israel or at least the Likud government.

    But, look, let's talk about this editing thing. Oddly enough, James O'Keefe got in a fair amount of trouble with the mainstream media because he was either allegedly not editing -- or not allegedly editing things. The media are clearly for it when it helps them and serves their causes and against it when it doesn't. It's a double standard. James O'Keefe did exactly the same thing in his own way and, oddly enough, isn't the toast of the town the way David Korn is.

    SCOTT: All right.

    Up next, big missteps in the media coverage of the deadly attacks in Libya.

    (COMMERCIAL BREAK)

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    JAY CARNEY, WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY: Let's be clear. These protests were in reaction to a video that had spread to the region.

    UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: Of Benghazi? What happened in Benghazi?

    CARNEY: We don't know. We don't know otherwise. We have no information to suggest that it was a preplanned attack. The unrest we've seen around the region has been in reaction to a video that Muslims, many Muslims find offensive. And while the violence is reprehensible and unjustified, it is not a reaction to the 9/11 anniversary that we know of or to U.S. policy.

    UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: The group around the Benghazi post was well armed. It was a well-coordinated attack. Do you think it was a spontaneous protest against a movie?

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    SCOTT: That was last week. Jay Carney, the White House spokesman, holding firm on the White House position that the recent 9/11 attacks on the U.S. consulate in Libya that killed four Americans was the result of spontaneous riots over a YouTube video offensive to Muslims. And as we discussed last week, the media parroted that position in the coverage. This week the story took a different turn.

    (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

    BRET BAIER, HOST OF "SPECIAL REPORT": Good evening. I'm Bret Baier, and this is a Fox News alert. We begin with a Fox News exclusive. Intelligence sources are convinced the attack on consulate in Libya was directly tied to Al Qaeda. And we've received word, just within the last few minutes that they think one person may be tied and may have led the attack on the ground. His name, Sufian Ben Qumu.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    SCOTT: And the White House changed its tune. Jay Carney, this week, suddenly said this: "It is, I think, self-evident that what happened in Benghazi was a terrorist attack. Our embassy was attending violently and the result was four deaths of American officials."

    Why the turnaround, Judy? And why haven't the media made more of it?

    MILLER: As we stay in journalism, facts are stubborn things, even when you try to ignore them for a week. There was a meme, to use Jim's word, and that was, this was a spontaneous eruption of outrage. Finally, enough material leaked out through the press, I must say, not enough, because the press wasn't asking the tough questions to force a change in the administration's line. That's what we have now. The tough questions lie ahead.

    SCOTT: Rick, you worked for U.N. ambassadors under Republican administrations. When Susan Rice, the current U.N. ambassador, goes out on TV and says, oh, this was spontaneous and all because of a movie?

    GRENELL: What is interesting about Susan Rice is immediate Sunday show dialogue is she wasn't pushed at all to really answer some tough questions. David Gregory did not push her. However, right after, when Netanyahu came on, David Gregory was really aggressive with Netanyahu. But with Susan Rice, she was able to talk about a narrative, this silly narrative of a film being the cause without any push back.

    However, I disagree with Judy. The U.S. media got it wrong. The international media has been right from the beginning. They've been looking at this and they called it a terrorist attack pretty fast.

    SCOTT: Jim?

    PINKERTON: Judy, I adore you --

    (LAUGHTER)

    -- But that phrase, "there was a meme," that passive voice. Maybe the meme came from someplace. Maybe if I was in the Obama administration, and I said, oh, my gosh, our embassy just got attacked on 9/11, and an ambassador was killed, gee, I better blame a mob somewhere. I better blame a movie. I better put a week's worth of chaff over the reality this is an Al Qaeda hit on a U.N. ambassador with no security. And Wall Street Journal, on Friday, did a terrific tick-tock, as it were, on the death of this ambassador and the three other Americans. If the mainstream media were truly interested in the story, they'd be all over it. And Hillary Clinton and everybody else at the State Department and Homeland Security would be grilled right now about how this happened, the way that Bush was. And it's not happening because there was a meme, Judy that said, no, no, it came from somewhere.

    MILLER: There was a meme because there was a line that was put out in the New York Times on Friday, just as Wall Street Journal was writing its piece, came to the exact opposite conclusion, and maintained that there was still not sufficient evidence of a substantial planned attack --

    (CROSSTALK)

    GRENELL: They couldn't find the guy.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (CROSSTALK)

    GRENELL: The New York Times couldn't find him. The Wall Street Journal interviewed him.

    (CROSSTALK)

    PINKERTON: The New York Times defending the Obama administration? You're kidding?

    (LAUGHTER)

    GRENELL: The Wall Street Journal interviewed him. The New York Times couldn't find him.

    WILLIAMS: I find -- I'm curious about our take on this because I'm still looking for hard proof that, in fact, Al Qaeda or some terrorist network was behind this. I think we have individuals who may have been involved. But -- so -- and also, remember, we're not just talking about Libya. We are also talking about Egypt. We know what happened in Egypt often was a direct causal relationship with this film that Muslims found offensive. Yes, I think the United States government should have been more alert to the fact that this all took place on 9/11. Yes, the U.S. government should have had better security at any of its embassies on 9/11. But is it the case that the White House is now going back on original statements? I wonder about that.

    SCOTT: Or maybe you are confused because the White House has given us a couple of --

    (CROSSTALK)

    PINKERTON: And meanwhile, the Obama administration has smeared one of our few allies that we have in the area, which is the Libyan government. The president of Libya went to a memorial service for Stevens. He's clearly sorry. The people of Libya clearly appreciate what we did for them a couple years ago. And to just simply say, well, they're an individual mob, no different than Egypt, is a disservice to our own long-term national interests, all to help, seemingly, the president get re-elected.