• With: Judy Miller, Jim Pinkerton, Monica Crowley, Kirsten Powers

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    ZELENY: What he's trying to do is make his case to Republican voters here. And it's a very common tactic for Republican presidential candidates or even Democratic presidential candidates to try to use the media as a foil. He clearly knew the cameras were rolling here.

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    SCOTT: Does Santorum have a case?

    CROWLEY: Well, look, Santorum has three main problems here. First, his use of the expletive really worked against his born-again Christian evangelical brand. And he was on a downward slope electorally anyway. He was slipping in the polls. Mitt Romney looked like the ultimate nominee by that point anyway. So the traction wasn’t going to happen for him. And the third point is that what Rick Santorum was saying here -- now, when you go after the media as a conservative, you have to go about it in the right way. Newt Gingrich knows how to do it. You go full frontal at the left-wing media and then back off. What he was doing there, and Santorum has done this before, is come off as looking a little whiney. And in that case it always back fires.

    SCOTT: All right. A page from the Newt Gingrich play book?

    MILLER: No, that's wannabe page.

    (LAUGHTER)

    And, no, it looked as Mitt Romney's people said it did, desperate, angry and unhinged.

    SCOTT: Up next, on "News Watch," Ron Burgundy is back.

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    PETER FINCH, ACTOR: I want you to get up right now and go to the window, open it, and stick your head out and yell, I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take this anymore!

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    SCOTT: Network anchorman, Howard Beale, played by actor Peter Finch there, delivering the famous Mad as Hell speech in the 1976 classic "Network," one of the few memorable films about the TV news business. In 1987, "Broadcast News," hit it with Albert Brooks, William Hurt and Holly Hunter in a film about a love triangle in the setting of a working TV network newsroom. That movie also introduced us to the term "flop sweat."

    (LAUGHTER)

    Then in 2004, came this soon-to-be classic.

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    FERRELL: I'm Ron Burgundy. You stay classy, San Diego.

    CHRISTINA APPLEGATE, ACTRESS: And thanks for stopping by.

    FERRELL: But mainly, stay classy.

    APPLEGATE: Thanks for stopping by.

    FERRELL: Stay classy. I'm Ron Burgundy.

    APPLEGATE: Thanks for stopping by.

    FERRELL: Stay classy.

    (END VIDEO CLIP)

    (LAUGHTER)

    SCOTT: "Anchorman," the legend of Ron Burgundy, played brilliantly by Will Ferrell, co-starring Christina Applegate and Steve Carell. That was 2004. And now, eight years later, just when you thought the airwaves and movie theaters were safe from the likes of Ron Burgundy, comes this.

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    FERRELL: Conan, you look awful.

    (LAUGHTER)

    CONAN O'BRIEN, HOST OF "CONAN": What? I look awful?

    FARRELL: You look like someone put a bright red wig fright wig on a skeleton --

    (LAUGHTER)

    -- and chucked it out of a helicopter.

    O'BRIEN: The idea you came on my show to play the flute and insult me. That was the idea?

    FARRELL: No, Paramount Pictures and myself and Ronald Joseph Aaron Burgundy have come to terms on a sequel to "Anchorman."

    (CHEERING)

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    SCOTT: And that is the wrap on "News Watch" this week.

    That's really how they announced it.