Saddam Photo 'Offensive'

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Saddam Photo "Offensive"

Al Jazeera (search), the Arab news agency that has often aired pictures of dead American soldiers and tortured hostages -- including the beheading of American Nick Berg -- has finally drawn the line of decency.

A spokesman for the network says Al Jazeera will not show that picture of Saddam Hussein in his skivvies because it is, "demeaning to Iraqis and not news."

The Force Is with Luke

On the culture watch here at home, Benjamin Franklin (search) has been pushed aside for Luke Skywalker.

The Boston Museum of Science turned down a traveling exhibit honoring the 300th birthday of one of our founding fathers. The reason? To make room for a huge exhibit that traces the science behind the "Star Wars" movies. Yes, R2-D2 will be on display, but not Ben.

Pen Mightier Than ...

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Pen Mightier Than ...

Former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein (search) is not wasting his time in jail while he awaits trial. According to a member of his legal team, Saddam has started writing his memoirs.

The work reportedly includes his childhood, his early exile to Egypt and some of his military campaigns. The former dictator is also writing poetry.

War on Terror Illusion

A British documentary, called "The Power of Nightmares," claims that the fear of terrorism is an illusion that's been crafted by American conservatives with the help of Prime Minister Tony Blair (search).

The work, by a senior BBC producer, also states that Al Qaeda and Usama bin Laden are far less powerful than government officials say they are.

Saying Sorry

Wal-Mart (search) has apologized for a newspaper ad that seemed to compare a proposed Arizona zoning ordinance to Nazi book burning.

The ad showed a photo from 1933 of people in Berlin throwing books on a fire, while complaining about a plan to limit the size of big-box retailers.

A Wal-Mart spokeswoman said the company approved the ad, but failed to question where the picture came from.

Your Mom Is Like…

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Bad Timing

A 17-year-old high school junior in Columbus, Ohio was suspended — in effect for the rest of the year — for using his cell phone (search) during school hours. But now, after a flood of protests, his suspension has been reduced.

So who was Kevin Francois on the phone with when he got in trouble? And why were there so many complaints about his punishment? It turns out he was talking with his mother who is serving with the U.S. Army in Iraq.

Welcome Home!

Authorities in Cape Coral, Florida also seem to believe in the letter of the law — no matter the occasion.

This past week, a city worker took down a homemade sign and some yellow ribbons that Kelly Smith put out to welcome home her daughter who's been stationed in Iraq. A police department spokesman said no signs were touched on private property.

Your Mom Is Like…

And finally this Mother's Day poll from FOX News and Opinion Dynamics: Who is your mother more like: first lady Laura Bush or Senator Hillary Clinton?

The results: 47 percent said Mrs. Bush; 21 percent chose Sen. Clinton.

Pushing Freedom

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Telling His Side

House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (search) met with the editorial board of the Wall Street Journal Friday.

Last month that paper was sharply critical of DeLay and his repeated ethics problems.

Editorial page editor Paul Gigot said the majority leader did not seem defensive when it came to the allegations against him. DeLay told the board, "I've never felt stronger than I do right now ... the members have never been more supportive."

Planning Ahead

The '08 Iowa Caucuses are almost three years away. But that hasn't stopped at least one informal endorsement and one ticked-off potential candidate.

Several weeks ago, Minnesota Senator Mark Dayton introduced Senator Hillary Clinton (search) at a luncheon, calling her the next great president of the United States. A couple of days later, according to Dayton's staff, Senator John Kerry approached Dayton on the Senate floor and angrily asked him why he had endorsed his '08 presidential opponent.

Kerry's staff tried to knock down the incident, but Dayton's people say it happened.

Pushing Freedom

Some college students are being praised and paid for defying administration officials and standing up for student rights.

Filmmaker Michael Moore (search) established a $2,500 "Freedom of Speech Award" for students attending California State University San Marcos. That's the institution that canceled an appearance by Moore last year.

Duck Tales

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Dynasty War?

No apologies from the office of Independent Senator Jim Jeffords (search), who said on a Vermont radio program that President Bush may start a war in Iran to help elect his brother Jeb to the White House. A spokesman for the senator says the theory has been discussed in political circles.

There's been bad blood between Jeffords and the White House ever since the senator left the Republican Party in 2001, after a "falling out" with the Bush administration.

Duck Tales

The Secret Service (search) — protector of presidents — is now also defender of a duck.

A brown mallard built a nest for her nine eggs just outside the main entrance to the Treasury Department on Pennsylvania Avenue. The Secret Service's uniformed division is now guarding the duck and the eggs.

Treasury Department staffers are calling the duck everything from "Quacks Reform" to "T-Bill" to "Duck Cheney."

Seeing Red

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Seeing Red

After his election to head the Democratic National Committee, Howard Dean (search) promised to visit so-called "red states." And, true to his word, Dean spent a couple of days recently in Kansas, which has voted for Republican presidential candidates for the last 40 years.

But apparently, Democratic Governor Kathleen Sebelius didn't get the memo. She couldn't meet with Dean. Her office says it was because of previous commitments. Kansas Republicans say because it would hurt her bid for re-election.

Many Thanks

A conservative group called Citizens United, hit liberal Hollywood Sunday night. Outside the Oscars, celebrities will see two billboards thanking them for helping to re-elect President Bush.

Pictures of Michael Moore (search), George Clooney, Barbara Streisand and other stars who supported John Kerry are on the billboards, right next to a smiling George W. Bush.

Taken To Task

Larry Summers, president of Harvard University (search), has been in academic hot water lately for comments he made about the lack of women in the sciences.

Well, according to the Harvard Crimson newspaper, a group of women in that field got together to discuss ways to get more women to major in science. Among their ideas: have "women-only" classes taught by women and "get to know each other" ice cream socials. Just imagine if Larry Summers had said that.

Seeing Red

Here’s the latest edition of Some Stories You Won't Find on any other Sunday show:

Seeing Red

After his election to head the Democratic National Committee, Howard Dean (search) promised to visit so-called "red states." And, true to his word, Dean spent a couple of days recently in Kansas, which has voted for Republican presidential candidates for the last 40 years.

But apparently, Democratic Governor Kathleen Sebelius didn't get the memo. She couldn't meet with Dean. Her office says it was because of previous commitments. Kansas Republicans say because it would hurt her bid for re-election.

Many Thanks

A conservative group called Citizens United, hit liberal Hollywood Sunday night. Outside the Oscars, celebrities will see two billboards thanking them for helping to re-elect President Bush.

Pictures of Michael Moore (search), George Clooney, Barbara Streisand and other stars who supported John Kerry are on the billboards, right next to a smiling George W. Bush.

Taken To Task

Larry Summers, president of Harvard University (search), has been in academic hot water lately for comments he made about the lack of women in the sciences.

Well, according to the Harvard Crimson newspaper, a group of women in that field got together to discuss ways to get more women to major in science. Among their ideas: have "women-only" classes taught by women and "get to know each other" ice cream socials. Just imagine if Larry Summers had said that.

The Real 'Deep Throat'?

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The Real "Deep Throat"?

It's one of the last great mysteries: Who was the source — called Deep Throat (search) — who helped Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward unravel Watergate? Well, FOX News media analyst Eric Burns reports that Deep Throat was not one person, but many.

Burns says that he learned from historian Stephen Ambrose (search) — who died two years ago — that Simon and Shuster — publisher for both Ambrose and The Post reporters — thought the original narrative had too many sources. So the editor suggested combining all the sources into one, called Deep Throat.

Woodward and Bernstein maintain that Deep Throat was one real person.

Cache Cash-In

California is one of 11 states that allows people to use marijuana (search) for medicinal purposes. But now, growers in Mendocino county want to capitalize on a trend in grocery stores and offer an organically certified product.

The Cautious Approach

The Public Broadcasting Service got "gun shy" with a new documentary called "A Company of Soldiers."

The show — about US troops in Iraq — has a lot of what can only be called "troop talk." So, PBS sent stations the original cut and a cleaned-up version. Stations that want to air the uncensored program must sign a waiver to prevent PBS from being fined by the FCC.

Food for Thought

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Multi-Front Campaign

It was been quite a week for PETA (search) — People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

First the group convinced the Mercedes Benz car company to save up to 15 cowhides per car by offering non-leather seats on some of its priciest models.

Then, after years of burning fur coats and tossing red paint on people who wear them, PETA decided to give away furs to homeless people here in Washington. The group said — it turns out — fur coats actually help keep people warm.

Food for Thought

A Wyoming health department study shows that 57 percent of state residents are overweight, or obese (search). But if any of them develop health problems, suing restaurants and ranchers may not be an option.

The Wyoming House voted this week to protect people who supply or serve food from the lawsuits of people who overeat.

Feel of Democracy

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Right Place... Right Time

Photojournalists need skill, courage and sometimes just plain luck — to be in the right place at the right time — to capture a great picture. But now, some people are wondering how several photographers in Iraq got dramatic pictures of a car exploding and people running around just after the blast.

They now suspect that the cameramen were either working with the terrorists, or were alerted to a staged event.

The Feel of Democracy

Much has been made of Iraqis casting absentee ballots here in the U.S. and around the world. But what about the scene in the country with the biggest bloc of expatriates?

Here's how Associated Press described what happened at one polling site: "a festive mood — bunting and placards decorating the walls — hundreds of excited voters lining the street."

Where was this? A mosque in Iran's capital of Tehran (search).

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