Leading Senate Voices on Foreign Affairs


Two leading foreign policy voices of the Senate joined "Fox News Sunday" to discuss the escalating conflict between Gaza and Israel and the investigation into what happened in Benghazi on September 11.


"The decision is up to Hamas whether there will be a ground invasion of Gaza," Senator Joe Lieberman (I-CT), who chairs the Homeland Security Committee, said.


Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), who is the vice-chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, added that the president needs to "apply every pressure to make sure this doesn’t escalate" into a full blown war.


The other leading headline this week was the ongoing investigation into what happened in Benghazi, and whether the administration tried to alter the intelligence communities' talking points for public consumption in the immediate aftermath of the attack.


Senator Chambliss, whose committee heard testimony from General David Petraeus as well as other leaders in the intelligence and law enforcement community this week, said no one knew who changed the talking points to strip out references to al Qaeda.


"We had every leader from intelligence community, none of the them knew who changed talking points," Chambliss said, adding that the only "entity who viewed talking points who was not there (at the hearing) was the White House."


Chambliss said he thinks it will be necessary to have US ambassador to the UN Susan Rice testify before his committee to respond to unanswered questions.


Senator Lieberman said he did not see any inconsistency between the initial consensus in the intelligence community talking points and what Ambassador Rice told the public in that first week following the attack.


"The initial opinion of the intelligence community was that there had been a protest before the attack-and that’s what the talking points reflected," Lieberman said.


Lieberman said he thinks the real questions to be asked revolve around why the US had State Department personnel in Benghazi without security, and why, when they were attacked, defense forces were not close enough to help.