• With: Charles Payne, Dagen Mcdowell, Charlie Gasparino, Adam Lashinsky

    DISCLAIMER: THE FOLLOWING "Cost of Freedom Recap" CONTAINS STRONG OPINIONS WHICH ARE NOT A REFLECTION OF THE OPINIONS OF FOX NEWS AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS INVESTMENT ADVICE WHEN MAKING PERSONAL INVESTMENT DECISIONS. IT IS FOX NEWS' POLICY THAT CONTRIBUTORS DISCLOSE POSITIONS THEY HOLD IN STOCKS THEY DISCUSS, THOUGH POSITIONS MAY CHANGE. READERS OF "Cost of Freedom Recap" MUST TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN INVESTMENT DECISIONS.

     

    SEPARATING FACT VS. MYTH FROM LAWMAKERS BLASTING BUDGET PLAN

    CHARLES PAYNE: Your point of view is absolutely fact. I tell you, well, the government is broke - they've got a hell of a cash flow coming in, but they're absolutely broke and morally bankrupt. And the thing she was talking about... I tell you what, take the XBOX from these kids and they'll be able to eat. Take the $150 sneakers from them and they'll be able to eat. By the way, create an atmosphere where they can get jobs and they'll be able to eat.

    DAGEN MCDOWELL: It is money we don't have. We're borrowing this "money" that we're spending. We're borrowing to pay of the interest on the money that we borrowed in the past.

    CHARLIE GASPARINO: I'm still trying to figure out why she said we're going to be eating off the ground or are kids are going to be...what was that all about? Did you get that? Or our kids are going to have no shoes. I mean, listen - kids are going to have no shoes, we're going to have economic calamity if-we're not going to have it tomorrow, let's face it. Doomsday isn't coming tomorrow. Day, day, day after...but it is going to come. And I'll tell you, I think Paul Ryan in presenting his budget made a pretty interesting case where he said, ‘Listen, we're not going to be able to have a social safety net if we don't reign it in some ways now.'

    ADAM LASHINSKY: Well, we're not broke, we're grossly oversimplifying this. We can spend, even though we have problems. But we don't stop spending, I mean, we're not going to stop paving roads or treating people when they come in and they're about to die in the emergency room. That's what we're talking about here, we need to figure out ways to spend responsibly.

    LABOR BOSS RICHARD TRUMKA TAKES UNION FIGHT GLOBAL

    CHARLIE GASPARINO: Well, I mean, it's just simple math. You can raise wages over there - that might not be bad for us, maybe some jobs will stay here. My knee-jerk reaction was to say something nasty about Trumka because I just can't stand him, isn't that logical?

    CHARLES PAYNE: This is outrageous. By the way, Richard Trumka needs to know there is tremendous growth outside of western highly-unionized countries. Okay, growth out of this world - 99.7 percent last month in China. How about India? What about Brazil? What about Vietnam? What about even Africa?

    DAGEN MCDOWELL: There have been plenty of manufacturing non-union jobs that have been created in this country by foreign auto workers and guess who the UAW wants to unionize? Toyota, Honda, even BMW here in the US to the point that they are sending activists overseas to stage rallies trying to curry favor with the companies in their home countries.

    ADAM LASHINSKY: First of all, what he [Trumka] is talking about is irrelevant. I'm going to get around to Charles in a second, Neil. But what a US labor leader has to say about what's going on in other countries is just not going to make a difference. But Charles, you're suggesting a cause-and-effect here - China's coming on because they don't have unions. That's a little bit silly. China's coming on because they were nothing. I mean, they've been down for 300 years and they're an autocratic regime that is now doing good things with its economy. That has absolutely nothing to do with unionization.

    AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS PUSHING FOR NAPTIME AT WORK

    CHARLES PAYNE: You know, I thought of Ben Stein, I was actually going to act like I was sleeping during that but I couldn't pull it off the way he would. Listen, for me, I think there are few things in life better than a nice, nice nap. Unfortunately when you try to bring in airplanes...that just doesn't work. I don't know, this is a real dilemma. Obviously, they should be up, they shouldn't be falling asleep, but there should be some mechanism in case someone has some other accident - I don't know, a physical ailment, some sort of physical attack. But this is preposterous that these people are getting paid and can't stay awake.

    DAGEN MCDOWELL: You know what's even more preposterous is the FAA is now analyzing napping recommendations through a study that was done with the FAA to decide whether it's okay to let the controllers nap on their breaks. A napping study? Can't they just schedule these controllers? See, I'm trying to tone it down. Schedule them so they're not working four midnight shifts in a row. Is it really that hard?

    CHARLIE GASPARINO: You kind of don't want them sleeping on the job though, right? I mean like, literally on the job. So, maybe, I don't know, what's a half hour nap?

    ADAM LASHINSKY: Pilots on long-haul flights already have the ability to take naps. That's all they're talking about here. I mean, yeah, we could have them work fewer hours or one of them could nap while the other one-the spare pilot. That's all we're talking about here.

    BUDGET-BOOSTING STOCKS

    CHARLES PAYNE: TRINITY INDUSTRIES (TRN)

    ADAM LASHINSKY: AMERICAN WATER WORKS (AWK)