• With: Elizabeth MacDonald, John Tamney, Sabrina Schaeffer, Rick Ungar, Rich Karlgaard, Mike Ozanian, Carrie Sheffield

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    EBOLA CASE IN NYC FUELING NEW CALLS TO BAN TRAVEL FROM WEST AFRICA

    ELIZABETH MACDONALD: We definitely want to help people affected by Ebola, absolutely; I think that's what a lot of people want. It's supposed to travel ban and pulling visas, 34 countries including 15 in Africa are doing it. Many in the Bahama region, Jamaica is doing it, South America, the Caribbean. It's pulling visas as well, so that's what they're doing. There are no direct flights to the U.S from these affected areas, but the stopping of the visas and the travel ban were seeing that taking hold.

    JOHN TAMNEY: If we ban flights from those parts of the world. All they have to do is fly from countries that we have not banned flights from. Ultimately if they want to get here they're going to get here.

    SABRINA SCHAEFFER: I agree with Elizabeth here. The fact is we have an administration that is more concerned with political correctness than actually properly protecting the American people. Lots of countries have issued quarantines and restricted travel in Africa. Lots of airlines have already stepped up. We have British Airways, and Senegal, and Korean airways, they're all limiting travel. There are two things that we can do. We can restrict travel and then we can have a more aggressive screening process. We have to take this a lot more seriously.

    RICK UNGAR: I actually am now much more favorable of the idea of letting people come but putting them into quarantine immediately if they came from one of those countries. I think that's more affective.

    RICH KARLGAARD: I think the greatest threat to global health right now is poverty because the global economy is slowing down. And you know 7 billion people, when the economy goes from five percent growth to two or three percent growth that materially affects hundreds of millions of people in a negative way. And what we're doing when we send out the signal I think it's an over response to try to ban travel, is that we're sending panic out into the world when we don't need panic right now, it's the last thing we need right now.

    NC SENATE CANDIDATES ACCUSING EACH OTHER OF PROFITING FROM GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS

    SABRINA SCHAEFFER: We have to outlaw political profiteri and the best way to do that is to shrink the size of government. Look this Kay Hagan example is eerily reminiscent to what happened with Maxine Waters a few years ago. When we saw that her husband, the director at One United Bank in New York, was having talks with the Treasury Department, and next thing we know TARP gave them 12 million dollars. This is all a little suspicious. At the very least it was a conflict of interest.

    MIKE OZANIAN: The only way were going to get rid of this type of thing is to reduce the amount of money and the amount of influence Washington has. If you go back to say 1960 to today, the size of government spending at all levels adjusted for population, adjusted for inflation, has almost tripled. That's why these guys go there; they feed off of the public trough because that's where the money is.

    ELIZABETH MACDONALD: What happened with Nancy Pelosi, she and her husband got the IPO early and then there were lobbyist coming into her office allegedly saying basically this new legislation that would curve credit cards swipe fees. So we see this behavior happening time and again and it isn't good.

    RICH KARLGAARD: I think that anybody who is in congress should remand themselves from a vote and a committee anytime that there's some possibility of having a conflict like that.

    JOHN TAMNEY: I think it is about the size of government. And I wish every American would take the time to visit Washington D.C just to see that over the last 12 years when they've been struggling that D.C has been booming. And so really you can't outlaw things like this. We're talking about human nature. So to Sabrina's point really the only way to do this is to shrink the size of government substantially.

    NEW REPORT: PREMIUMS FOR CHEAPEST OBAMACARE PLAN TO JUMP 14 percent IN 2015

    CARRIE SHEFFIELD (FORBES CONTRIBUTER): I've got my letter right here. So my plan on the exchange was supposed to jack up by 18.4 percent. I have dropped out of the plan; I am going to get a different plan because this is ridiculous. It's horrible for contractors, for small business owners, and when I moved to the exchange president Obama lied to me. He said you can keep your doctor; I did not get to keep my doctor, period.

    RICH KARLGAARD: You know the article that this was based on was interesting, I read it with great interest because if you look at what the Kaiser family foundation, which I think is generally regarded as fair and balanced group. They've come out with a very different result using the same cities. In fact they suggest that it would go down a teeny bit. So here is what I discovered, and I'll leave it up to all of you to decide for yourself, it's in the methodology. If you think that your salary is going to go up next year based on inflation, then what the article says could be true.

    MIKE OZANIAN: What we're seeing from ObamaCare is really ultimately it's about shared misery for all except perhaps the very wealthy. 71 percent of the new enrollees of ObamaCare have been put on to Medicaid right? And that's supposed to be for the poor.

    SABRINA SCHAEFFER: I have my letter here. It doesn't say like Kerry's exactly how much it's going to go up, but I like my insurance they're very clear. They say that the Affordable Care Act requires that they cover for all sorts of things that I currently don't have covered. So I expect on Monday or Tuesday or the next week that I'm going to get the letter that Kerry did saying that my premiums will go up.

    RICK UNGAR: None of this should surprise anyone. We predicted this on the show for months and months. When you increase demand without providing any incentive for the supply of new innovative healthcare that could drive down costs as it drives down the costs in practically every other field, then it's inevitable that prices are going to go up.