• With: Charles Payne, Charlie Gasparino, Dagen McDowell, Ben Stein, Adam Lashinsky

    DISCLAIMER: THE FOLLOWING "Cost of Freedom Recap" CONTAINS STRONG OPINIONS WHICH ARE NOT A REFLECTION OF THE OPINIONS OF FOX NEWS AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS INVESTMENT ADVICE WHEN MAKING PERSONAL INVESTMENT DECISIONS. IT IS FOX NEWS' POLICY THAT CONTRIBUTORS DISCLOSE POSITIONS THEY HOLD IN STOCKS THEY DISCUSS, THOUGH POSITIONS MAY CHANGE. READERS OF "Cost of Freedom Recap" MUST TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN INVESTMENT DECISIONS.

    GOP CANDIDATES ATTACKING CORE PRINCIPLES IN NOMINATION FIGHT

    Charles Payne: Some voices are more out of tune than others. Newt Gingrich is really a crybaby. The guy who said he was a capitalist-he's not only attacking Mitt Romney, he's attacking a pillar of the party.

    Charlie Gasparino: The republicans are not in the majority and you have to cut them a little bit of a break here. Nothing will happen with them controlling the House and not the Senate. Paul Ryan put out a great plan and the President and Senate blocked him.

    Dagen McDowell: The only thing that is consistent is that there are no democrats and republicans. They are all politicians. They're worried about the people who are going to reelect them to office. They are saying one thing and doing another. We are talking about putting your money and actions where your mouth is and they are not doing it.

    Ben Stein: As long as politicians can vote to spend the taxpayers' money and thereby reelect themselves and get that prestigious, cushy life in Washington, they're going to. You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows because it's blowing all different ways at all different times. The constant is money. If you can spend other guy's money to get yourself elected, they'll do it. Money is the constant. Proof is a variable.

    Adam Lashinsky: The Republican Party is completely inconsistent on the subject of capitalism. By the way, the democrats are too. Philosophically, the establishment democrats and republicans are far closer to each other in their support of capitalism than the far left, which hates capitalism and the far right, which hates capitalism too. The tea parties are not capitalists. They're populists.

    BANKRUPT SOLAR FIRM SOLYNDRA SEEKING TO PAY OUT BONUSES

    Charles Payne: There is a difference with the companies Charlie mentioned. Those companies were reorganizing. They were going to be around. Solyndra is like, you know what, the only reason we might keep them is because these are the only guys that the hazmat chemical suits that fit. They fit these guys perfectly. So, don't leave.

    Charlie Gasparino: The only saving grace is that we did it at Citigroup. We did it at AIG. But, it really is a despicable practice that a company that's bankrupt and bailout, funded by the government is giving bonuses.

    Dagen McDowell: I'm not going to be hypocritical. I didn't have a problem with the AIG bonuses. You have to pay to keep people. I don't like bailouts. I don't like handouts from the government, but I don't want any more government intervention. These bonuses have to be approved by the bankruptcy trustee. The bonuses seem very big, but as percentage of the salary, one of these bonuses is about 30 percent, which is normal.

    Ben Stein: This is enough to make you throw up. This is stunning and it's amazing. If those people at Solyndra can find other jobs, want to go get other jobs, I'm sure they can replace them with people who do not need a bonus. It shocks me. The greed and rapaciousness and lack of shame of the people at Solyndra is disappointing.

    Adam Lashinsky: This is not shocking at all. When a company goes bankrupt the people who hold the assets, who are the creditors, want to retain certain people to make sure it doesn't go away completely. We would do it in every case. It's ugly, but it's capitalism.

    PRESIDENT OBAMA URGING COMPANIES TO HIRE WORKERS IN AMERICA

    Charles Payne: This has been going on for decades. That meeting was pretty interesting because hardly anyone showed up. Vice President Biden had to take a seat like one of these award shows where they have to pay people to fill in. It's pretty clear-obviously clear. These states are going to do well.

    Charlie Gasparino: South Carolina has 10 percent unemployment and that's one of the reasons they're going there-they can get cheaper labor. Right-to-work is part of it, but it's high unemployment and they can get people cheap.

    Dagen McDowell: There are a lot of reasons that a company relocates to a right-to-work states. They don't have to worry about union rules that get in the way of doing business-work stoppages. By the way, the numbers show in right-to-work states over the last decade, those states have faster growth state product growth, faster population growth, faster income growth.

    Ben Stein: If companies can get disciplined, hard working labor for low wages they'll do it. They'll move to the Southeastern U.S. and they'll get disciplined, hard working labor for low wages. It's that simple. It's not at all complicated.

    Adam Lashinsky: There are many factors why they go there and undoubtedly, ten to twenty years ago one of them was because the union situation in Michigan and Ohio was so terrible. Now they're going there because they're there. That's why those companies are putting new jobs there...because they already have jobs there.

    STOCKS WITH A LONG SHELF LIFE

    Charles Payne: Cheniere Energy (LNG)

    Ben Stein: Ford (F)

    Adam Lashinsky: Best Buy (BBY)