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    Bulls & Bears | Cavuto on Business | Forbes on Fox | Cashin' In

    Bulls & Bears

    Should President Obama Use Bailout Bucks For More Stimulus or Pay Down Debt?

    Eric Bolling, Fox Business Network: The TARP doesn't allow the government to spend the money on other things. TARP money is coming back to the government, and it should go back to the taxpayer. Pay the debt down. It in no way should go to politicians' pet projects. Originally, the government said the taxpayer was going to get money back. It's time for the government to hold on to their end of the bargain.

    Ephren Taylor, Incoming Inc.: I think you can go to just about any American household and see that jobs are a troubled asset right now. They aren't there. A lot of corporations were able to make a ton of money off of TARP, but the average American hasn't seen anything from it. None of the TARP money has helped the average American.

    Tobin Smith, ChangeWave Research: If you really want to help businesses and create jobs, give every small business a two-year moratorium on every dollar they invest to expand their business or create a new job. We'd have so many new jobs, the government wouldn't know what to do with the surplus. In some cases, the government has made money on its TARP investments and the last thing we should do it waste it on another jobs program.

    Gary B. Smith, TheChartman.com: Only in America could you create a program like the stimulus where you miss your unemployment target number by 25 percent, then go back to the American people and say, "let's keep doing it!" We have to recall the Obama administration said unemployment would top out at 7.9 percent with the stimulus. It's at 10 percent. This is not trivial; we're talking about millions of jobs. The jobs the government says it has created are bogus at best. And now they want to take TARP funds and spend more on the same stuff. This is the height of lunacy.

    Pat Dorsey, Morningstar.com: I think it's possible we see this become a kind of slush fund for lawmakers. As we know, economies heal themselves with time. Businesses regain confidence and reinvest. I think we're starting to see that happen. The long-term issue at hand that will not solve itself is the deficit. So taking those funds to pay down the deficit would make a lot of sense.

    Should Congress Be Forced to Use Government-Run Care?

    Gary B. Smith: Senator Chuck Grassley was the first to raise the hypocrisy of this issue, and it's beautiful. These congressmen are a bunch of hypocrites ordering Americans that this is the sort of health coverage they're going to have—but congressmen get to choose what sort of coverage they receive. Let them eat cake. We all know this public option is going to become a mandate before we know it.

    Ephren Taylor: I think it's ridiculous we're making a big deal about this. I don't like the word "force" to begin with. People should have a choice. They should have an option. People and employers should be able to choose between public and private health care options. More choice is a good thing.

    Eric Bolling: Senator Vitter came out and said that if we're passing a public option, all Congressional members need to be on it. Senator Grassley said that all Congressional staffers should have to enroll in the public option too. All of a sudden, Democrats begin backing away saying they don't want to enroll in a public option program. Nor do they want their staffs to. It's causing Democrats to start rethinking this whole thing.

    Tobin Smith: Government workers on average right now are already earning higher pay than private sector workers, so why wouldn't they get cushy treatment? Everybody assumes this public option will be cheaper than what they already have. But when you start running numbers on it, it may end up being more expensive than the Cadillac plan currently in Congress. We can't be too hasty on passing this legislation.

    Pat Dorsey: I think we need to go back to what this plan is called, a "public option"--as in it's an option. Congress should not be exempted from it, but at the same time not forced into it. That doesn't make sense either. There should be equal treatment for all.

    Is President Obama's Green Jobs Plan the Fastest Fix for Our Job Market?

    Tobin Smith: This plan is a clunker for the market. If you want to spend $750,000 to create one job, it's a fantastic idea. Spain has done this for the last eight years, and it cost them $750,000 per job when they added all the numbers up. And the worst part was that only about one-in-ten of those jobs lasted after the government removed its subsidies. This is an absolute recipe for disaster.

    Ephren Taylor: We've certainly had issues when it comes to green job creation in the country. But it doesn't mean we shouldn't move forward and put these jobs in place. Long term, it will benefit our economy. We shouldn't just wait. We shouldn't just leave behind emerging industries that could have beneficial effects for our economy in the long term. Otherwise, other countries are going to take the lead on this stuff and leave us in the dust technologically.

    Eric Bolling: Green jobs are great for the administration. Why? You can't quantify them. It's tremendously difficult to figure out how many manufacturing jobs can specifically be designated as "green". But most green jobs are in research and technology. There's just little way to prove what kind and how many jobs you're creating.

    Pat Dorsey: The only thing that will make a difference here is time. We don't need to spend more money on jobs. They're being created right now. The economy is healing, and we just have to wait. It's not the most politically fun thing to do. But if the market wants green jobs, then positions in that sector will grow and expand.