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Native peoples find common ground at World Indigenous Games
For many of the nearly 2,000 participants from some 20 countries who converged last week on host city Palmas, a remote agricultural outpost in Brazil's scorched heartland, the sports themselves took a back seat to what they said really matters — cross-cultural sharing and learning.
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A Brazilian Indian Bororo attends a competition at the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. Billed as the indigenous Olympics, the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian ethnicity, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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Members of the Xerente soccer team pose for a group photo before before the start of a match against fellow Brazilian tribe Pataxo, during the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Billed as the first "indigenous Olympics", the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian native tribes, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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A Gaviao Indian girl plays tug-of-war during the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015. The debut competitions were pushed back to Sunday, which saw a surprise upset in the blistering tug-of-war event: New Zealandâs fierce Maori warriors lost a battle of the titans against the fridge-sized Bakairi people, of central Brazil. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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Pataxo men watch a soccer match against a fellow Brazilian tribe, Xerente, during the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. The World Indigenous Games officially opens Friday, when President Dilma Rousseff is expected to attend a lavish opening ceremony in the games' host city, Palmas, a remote outpost in the sunbaked heart of Brazil. Billed as the first "indigenous Olympics", the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian native tribes, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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A Brazilian Gaviao Indian takes part in the bow and arrow competition at the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2015. Billed as the indigenous Olympics, the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian ethnicities, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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A Maori from the New Zealand performs during the ceremony of the sacred fire of the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Billed as the indigenous Olympics, the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian ethnicities, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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A New Zealand Indian Maori takes part in the spear throwing competition at the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2015. Billed as the indigenous Olympics, the games are expected to attract nearly 2,000 athletes from dozens of Brazilian ethnicities, as well as from such far-flung nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

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Indians from various ethnic groups and countries dance during the opening ceremony of the World Indigenous Games, in Palmas, Brazil, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Billed as the indigenous Olympics, the games are expected to attract athletes from dozens of Brazilian ethnicities, as well as from such nations as Ethiopia and New Zealand. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Native peoples find common ground at World Indigenous Games

For many of the nearly 2,000 participants from some 20 countries who converged last week on host city Palmas, a remote agricultural outpost in Brazil's scorched heartland, the sports themselves took a back seat to what they said really matters — cross-cultural sharing and learning.

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