LIFESTYLE

Chilean chefs bringing international twists to traditional fare
While some chefs are reawakening the ancestral dishes of the indigenous Mapuche and Rapa Nui, others are reimagining modern fare by experimenting with local ingredients, including edible flowers from places such as Patagonia and the snow-peaks of the Andes mountains.
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This Nov. 19, 2014 photo shows servings of Patagonian lamb on top of a tomato and onion sauté, ribs, octopus and salmon ceviches, quinoa, sweet onions and other entrees served in tapas-like portions at the Carlo Cocina Mercado Gourmet, in Santiago, Chile. Chefs in the South American country are revolutionizing Chilean cuisine, one bite at a time, and curious foodies from around the world are increasingly traveling to Santiago to sample their recipes. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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This Dec. 17, 2014 photo shows servings of conger, rabbit and horse, at the Peumayen restaurant, cooked by chef Juan Manuel Pena, in Santiago, Chile. A few years back we were still arguing among chefs about what makes a Chilean flavor? What is Chilean gastronomy? said Pena, an Argentine whos lived in Chile for the past decade. But its been settled now. We took a step forward. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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In this Dec. 23, 2014 photo, customers buy products at the Carlo Cocina Mercado Gourmet, in Santiago, Chile. The gourmet market-style restaurant has meant reinventing how traditional staples are served, such as arranging bits of ceviche or a little tomatican, a sautee of tomato, corn and onion, in individual portions. The business also sells local products such as bottled water from Patagonia and olives from the Atacama desert. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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In this Dec. 17, 2014 photo, chef Juan Manuel Pena holds a wooden board of bite-size breads arranged geographically from Chiles north to its south at the Peumayen restaurant in Santiago, Chile. The board includes poe a plantain-based cake from the Rapa Nui, the inhabitants of Easter Island, the remote South Pacific territory Chile annexed in 1888. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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In this Feb. 13, 2015 photo, algae tops a list of ingredients for possible recipes, written on a chalkboard at the Borago restaurant in Santiago, Chile. While some chefs are reawakening the ancestral dishes of the indigenous Mapuche and Rapa Nui, others are reimagining typical fare by experimenting with local ingredients, including edible flowers from places such as Patagonia and the snow-peaks of the Andes mountains. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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This Feb. 13, 2015 photo shows a variation of a traditional stew known as a chupe, this one made with forest mushrooms and decorated with thin leaves of crunchy wild plants, on a flat stone at the Borago restaurant in Santiago, Chile. The ingredients in the evolving dishes in Chile's cuisine are as wide-ranging as the country's geography. They include fresh olives grown in some of the worlds driest deserts in the far north to merquen, a blend of smoked red chilies and coriander seeds native to the southern region of Araucania that the Mapuche claim as their ancestral territory. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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This Feb. 13, 2015 photo shows organic veal, cooked in its own milk, garnished with an aromatic branch and a dark-red elderberry called sauco on a table at the Borago restaurant in Santiago, Chile. While some chefs are reawakening the ancestral dishes of the indigenous Mapuche and Rapa Nui, others are re-imagining typical fare by experimenting with local ingredients, including edible flowers from places such as Patagonia and the snow-peaks of the Andes mountains. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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In this Dec. 23, 2014 photo, a cooking assistant pours crushed ice over bottles of berry-lemonade, orange juice and champagne at the Carlo Cocina Mercado Gourmet, in Santiago, Chile. The gourmet market-style restaurant also sells local products such as bottled water from Patagonia and olives from the Atacama desert. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

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In this Feb. 14, 2015 photo, chef Rodolfo Guzman, owner of the Borago restaurant, holds up a plate smeared with maqui berries, in Santiago, Chile. The restaurant has been named in the Latin American section of the San Pellegrinos Worlds Best Restaurant list. Weve developed in our kitchens all these foods that the Mapuche had been eating for hundreds of years. (AP Photo/Luis Andres Henao)

Chilean chefs bringing international twists to traditional fare

While some chefs are reawakening the ancestral dishes of the indigenous Mapuche and Rapa Nui, others are reimagining modern fare by experimenting with local ingredients, including edible flowers from places such as Patagonia and the snow-peaks of the Andes mountains.

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