LIFESTYLE

Bolivian grandmothers take to the handball court to stay healthy
The games are part of a program in El Alto, near La Paz, that encourages older people to stay healthy by remaining active. It also provides free medical care to around 10,000 participants.
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In this Feb. 4, 2105 photo, 72-year-old Aurea Murillo prepares to make a pass during a handball match among elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. Murillo said now that her children are grown she's dedicating time to herself and that playing handball makes her feel good. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, Rosa Lima plays handball with other elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. There are days my knees hurt from rheumatism, but when I play it goes away, said 77-year-old Lima, who first began doing simple exercises eight years ago, then later took up team handball. She lives alone and looks forward to playing with her friends every week. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous women warm up before playing handball in El Alto, Bolivia. There are days my knees hurt from rheumatism, but when I play it goes away, said 77-year-old Rosa Lima, who first began doing simple exercises eight years ago, then later took up team handball. She lives alone and looks forward to playing with her friends every week. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous women hold on to each other as they run laps to warm up for a handball game in El Alto, Bolivia. The grandmothers, known in the Aymara language as Awichas," warm-up with exercises while singing a childhood song. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, 72-year-old Aurea Murillo prepares to make a pass during a handball match among elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. Dozens of traditional Aymara grandmothers ease many of the aches and pains of aging by practicing a sport that is decidedly untraditional in Bolivia: team handball. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous women rest on the bleachers after playing handball in El Alto, Bolivia. Known in the Aymara language as awichas, or grandmothers, the women pull sports jerseys over their long-sleeved blouses and ruffled skirts to play the game. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, a photographer takes a group picture of elderly Aymara indigenous women who play handball together in El Alto, Bolivia. The city's health program for seniors so far has spread to almost half of the city's districts. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, a doctor checks Aurea Murillo's eyes during a general health check-up after Murillo played a handball game in El Alto, Bolivia. Older people practice sports, play Andean music and recall their younger years through the city sponsored health program that also provides free medical care. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous woman Rosa Barco removes her sneakers after playing handball with fellow seniors in El Alto, Bolivia. The women, some of them great-grandmothers, arrive with their tennis shoes once a week, part of a program that the city sponsors to encourage older people to stay healthy by remaining active. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, 84-year-old Juana Poma stands in the goal area during a handball game among elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. This helps us a lot, said Poma, a great-grandmother of five, referring to playing handball. Look, Im full of life, but Im also thinner. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous women run laps during a training session before playing handball in El Alto, Bolivia. Dozens of traditional Aymara grandmothers ease many of the aches and pains of aging by practicing a sport that is decidedly untraditional in Bolivia: team handball. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Jan. 28, 2105 photo, 83-year-old Josefina Tito slips a jersey over her dress as she prepares for a handball game with fellow Aymara indigenous elderly women in El Alto, Bolivia. Tito said she's been playing handball for nine years, and that she also plays other sports with her son at home. "I'm always playing" she said. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 4, 2105 photo, an Aymara man holding a flute rests in the stands of covered court in El Alto, Bolivia. The man watched elderly Aymara indigenous women play handball. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, elderly Aymara indigenous women play handball in El Alto, Bolivia. Team handball is an Olympic sport in which two teams of pass a ball using their hands with the aim of throwing it into the others goal. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 11, 2105 photo, 78-year-old Genara Quispe plays handball with other Aymara indigenous elderly women in El Alto, Bolivia. "This sport makes me feel alive and that I can still run around," Quispe said. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

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In this Feb. 4, 2105 photo, Aymara indigenous women watches elderly Aymara women warm up to play handball in El Alto, Bolivia. The games the grandmothers participate in are part of a program that El Alto sponsors to encourage older people to stay healthy by remaining active. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivian grandmothers take to the handball court to stay healthy

The games are part of a program in El Alto, near La Paz, that encourages older people to stay healthy by remaining active. It also provides free medical care to around 10,000 participants.

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