LIFESTYLE

Mexico's Hunger Crusade: Are People Are Still Going Hungry?
The Mexican government says its crusade against hunger has helped more than 3 million people, but critics say those numbers are skewed as people are still going hungry.
http://www.foxnews.com/">Fox News
http://www.foxnews.com/

Mexico_Hunger_C

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, children buy a bag of sugar, cookies and detergent at a state-run store in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. Much of the food is canned or packaged and shipped from major cities, a practice experts and indigenous advocates called a missed opportunity to help the development of local agriculture. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_D

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, children snack on custard and yogurt as they sit on the stoop of a small convenience store in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. More than a year after President Enrique Pena Nieto launched what he called a national crusade against hunger, the government says 3 million Mexicans are eating better. However, independent experts say that number is questionable and the crusade against hunger appears to be doing far less than advertised. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_H

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, Santiago Vazquez, 95, stands at the entrance of his son's home that is under construction with state assistance in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. In the 400 poorest and most malnourished of the countrys 2,400 municipalities that include Cochoapa, the administration of Enrique Pena Nieto has been trying to enroll more people in existing social programs such as Opportunities, which provides a small monthly stipend to qualifying poor Mexicans. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_G

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, a man sits in a community kitchen dining area in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. The kitchen is supposed to open from Monday to Friday and provide free food for breakfast and lunch, but on this day no food was being prepared. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_K

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, a dog sits on a sidewalk in front of a small restaurant in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. The farming town of 2,600 people is located high in the pine-covered mountains of Guerrero state in southern Mexico. More than a year after President Enrique Pena Nieto launched what he called a national crusade against hunger, the government says 3 million Mexicans are eating better. However, independent experts say that number is questionable and the crusade against hunger appears to be doing far less than advertised.(AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_F

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, a woman watches as her child is weighed during their monthly visit to a health clinic in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. In the 400 poorest and most malnourished of the countrys 2,400 municipalities, that include Cochoapa, the Mexican government has been trying to enroll more people in existing social programs such as Opportunities, which provides a small monthly stipend to qualifying poor Mexicans, as long as they meet requirements, such as taking their children to the monthly clinic visits. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_B

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, the menu of the day is posted on the wall in the dining area of a community kitchen in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. The menu lists an oatmeal based hot drink with milk and three cookies, eat with egg, rice, and a sweetened drink made with hibiscus flowers. The kitchen is supposed to open from Monday to Friday and provide free food for breakfast and lunch, but on this day no food was being prepared. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_L

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, children play soccer on a field in San Miguel Amoltepec, Mexico. Since independence more than two centuries ago, Mexico has suffered from persistently high levels of poverty and economic inequality, but Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto is the first president to focus so intently on hunger, which his administration calls the most pressing problem facing the countrys poorest citizens. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_E

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, Margarito de la Cruz, 26, boils corn for tortilla dough at his home in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. Since independence more than two centuries ago, Mexico has suffered from persistently high levels of poverty and economic inequality, but Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto is the first president to focus so intently on hunger, which his administration calls the most pressing problem facing the countrys poorest citizens. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Hunger_J

In this Feb. 11, 2014 photo, a woman stands next to her wheelbarrow as she shops for supplies at a state-run store in Cochoapa El Grande, Mexico. Seven million Mexicans the government says are suffering from a combination of extreme poverty and malnourishment even as the country suffers from among the worlds highest rates of obesity. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico's Hunger Crusade: Are People Are Still Going Hungry?

The Mexican government says its crusade against hunger has helped more than 3 million people, but critics say those numbers are skewed as people are still going hungry.

More From Our Sponsors