LIFESTYLE

In Bright Petticoats And Multilayered Skirts, 'Traffic Cholitas' Bring Order To El Alto
The city of El Alto in Bolivia's highlands has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multilayered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos.
http://www.foxnews.com/">Fox News
http://www.foxnews.com/

Bolivia_Cholitas_8

In this Nov. 28, 2013 photo, Aymara women traffic cops speak during a training session before heading out to control the vehicular traffic on the streets of El Alto, Bolivia. The Bolivian highlands' city has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multi-layered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_7

In this Dec. 9, 2013 photo, traffic at a standstill as pedestrians cross a street in El Alto, Bolivia. The Bolivian highlands' city has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multi-layered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_10

In this Dec. 3, 2013 photo, an Aymara woman cops directs traffic on the streets of El Alto, Bolivia. The women wear the bright petticoats and shawls of indigenous women in the Andes, called cholitas in Bolivian slang, the main difference being that instead of bowler hats they wear khaki green police-style caps. Some don fluorescent traffic vests. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas

In this Nov. 28, 2013 photo, so-called traffic cholitas run laps during a training session in El Alto, Bolivia. About 20 so-called traffic cholitas have been trained to direct cars and buses in El Alto, the teeming, impoverished sister city of La Paz in the Bolivias Andes mountains. The indigenous traffic policewomen will also educate pedestrians and help old people to cross roads, said Jose Luis Varagas, head of El Altos transportation department. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_4

In this Dec. 13, 2013 photo, an Aymara woman uses hand-and-arm signals to direct traffic in El Alto, Bolivia. About 20 so-called traffic cholitas have been trained to direct cars and buses in El Alto, the teeming, impoverished sister city of La Paz in the Bolivias Andes mountains. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_2

In this Nov. 28, 2013 photo, so-called traffic cholitas perform jumping jacks during a training session in El Alto, Bolivia. The Bolivian highlands' city has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multi-layered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_3

In this Dec. 13, 2013 photo, an Aymara traffic policewomen, right, aids a woman in crossing a street in El Alto, Bolivia. The traffic policewomen wear the bright petticoats and shawls of indigenous women in the Andes, called cholitas in Bolivian slang, the main difference being that instead of bowler hats they wear khaki green police-style caps. Some don fluorescent traffic vests.(AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_6

In this Nov. 28, 2013 photo, the image of an Aymara woman adjusting her khaki green police-style cap is reflected in a mirror in El Alto, Bolivia. The traffic policewomen wear the bright petticoats and shawls of indigenous women in the Andes, called cholitas in Bolivian slang, the main difference being that instead of bowler hats they wear khaki green police-style caps. Some don fluorescent traffic vests. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Bolivia_Cholitas_5

In this Dec. 13, 2013, so-called traffic cholitas stand in formation before heading out to the streets to control and direct traffic in El Alto, Bolivia. The Bolivian highlands' city has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multi-layered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

In Bright Petticoats And Multilayered Skirts, 'Traffic Cholitas' Bring Order To El Alto

The city of El Alto in Bolivia's highlands has hired Aymara women dressed in traditional multilayered Andean skirts and brightly embroidered vests to work as traffic cops and bring order to its road chaos.

More From Our Sponsors