LIFESTYLE

Judaism Converts Find Acceptance In Mexico City
Known as conversos, or secret Jews, many Latin Americans have became Catholic in public while continuing their forbidden Jewish practices in private.
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Rabbi Jacques Cukierkorn officiates at the Jewish wedding of

Eyal & Rebeca Wong, Mexico City, Mexico.

(Paul Ross)

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Beatriz VillacaƱa performs ladino songs at the recent Brit Braja conference in Mexico City.

(Paul Ross)

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Israel Rocha, who become a leader in Brit Braja in Mexico City musically assists at religious services with song.

(Paul Ross)

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Edgar Mendez, a former priest, delivered a powerful talk at the recent Brit Braja conference in Mexico City.

(Paul Ross)

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A beit din questions a would-be convert as part of final test before his acceptance into the Jewish community.

(Paul Ross)

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During Sabbath service, Rabbi Jacques Cukierkorn hands a torah to new convert Charton Baggio, who came all the way from Brazil for the proceedings in Mexico City.

(Paul Ross)

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Rabbi Jacques Cukierkorn presides over a mikvah (ritual bath) in a spring-fed pool for convert Francisco Brambilla, Mexico City, Mexico.

(Paul Ross)

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Raul and Margarita Martinez read prayers in Hebrew at a recent service in Mexico City.

(Paul Ross)

Judaism Converts Find Acceptance In Mexico City

Known as conversos, or secret Jews, many Latin Americans have became Catholic in public while continuing their forbidden Jewish practices in private.

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