LIFESTYLE

Spanish Matadors Turn To Peru To Achieve Fame
Dozens of Spaniards bullfighters are struggling to gain fame in Latin America, something the economic crisis has made nearly impossible back home.
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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Lisbon native and bullfighter Nuno Casquinha, choreographs moves before a performance before a bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. Casquinha has got 48 Peruvian bullfights notched, and his confidence is up. âIâm going to leave here a winner, a well-known figure in bullfighting. Iâll make a mark. I wonât return to Europe a failure,â Casquinha asserted during one of his daily two-hour training sessions in a Lima park. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Lisbon native and bullfighter Nuno Casquinha, bows his head in prayer before his performance at a makeshift bullfighting ring in Lachaqui, Peru. Dozens of bullfighters, mostly Spaniards, are hoping to gain fame in Latin America since Spain's economic crisis, compounded by rising ethical opposition to the bloody sport, has made it near impossible to compete there. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Lisbon native and bullfighter Nuno Casquinha, waits to make the paseíllo or ritual entrance at the start of a bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. When Casquinha left home early last year, heâd only managed to get into one bullfight in the first four months of last year, spending his time instead raising bulls on his parentsâ farm and training in the familyâs basement. âIâm going to leave here a winner, a well-known figure in bullfighting. Iâll make a mark. I wonât return to Europe a failure,â Casquinha asserted. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Lisbon native bullfighter Nuno Casquinha, right, talks with and fellow bullfighter Emilio Serna of Spain, second from the right, and a local bullfighter outside arena in Lachaqui, Peru. The Andean country hosts 540 bullfights or corridas a year, more than any other in Latin America. Currently, 59 European bullfighters are active in Peru, according to Agenda Taurina, Peruâs leading bullfighting guide. Thatâs nearly three times the 2008 roster. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Spanish bullfighter Emilio Serna performs during a bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. The Andean country hosts 540 bullfights or corridas a year, more than any other in Latin America. Currently, 59 European bullfighters are active in Peru, according to Agenda Taurina, Peruâs leading bullfighting guide. Thatâs nearly three times the 2008 roster. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, Lisbon native and bullfighter Nuno Casquinha, left, and bullfighter Emilio Serna of Spain, prepare for their performance at a bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. Dozens of bullfighters, mostly Spaniards, are hoping to gain fame in Latin America since Spain's economic crisis, compounded by rising ethical opposition to the bloody sport, has made it near impossible to compete there. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, a bird's eye view of a makeshift bullfight arena in Lachaqui, Peru. The Andean country hosts 540 bullfights or corridas a year, more than any other in Latin America. Currently, 59 European bullfighters are active in Peru, according to Agenda Taurina, Peruâs leading bullfighting guide. Thatâs nearly three times the 2008 roster. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this June 23, 2013 photo, bullfighter Conchi Rios of Spain, poses for a photos with local fans before her performance at a bullfighting event in Lima, Peru. Dozens of bullfighters, mostly Spaniards, are hoping to gain fame in Latin America since Spain's economic crisis, compounded by rising ethical opposition to the bloody sport, has made it near impossible to compete there. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this June 23, 2013 photo, bullfighter Conchi Rios of Spain, looks on during her performance in Lima, Peru. Star matadors in Spain can charge upwards of $200,000 for a single performance. In rural Peru, the European migrants get paid about $1,500 per outing. Normally, three matadors participate in each âfiesta taurina,â or bullfighting event. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, an employee fixes a makeshift flag pole with a representation of Portugal's national flag attached, as representations of national flags from Peru and Spain flutter in the wind, before the start of a âfiesta taurina,â or a bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. In the Peru of rugged mountains and unknown backwater corridas the Spanish tradition is as alive as ever, the bulls have no pedigree and getting gored is best avoided because hospitals are scarce. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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In this July 16, 2013 photo, a poster advertises an upcoming bullfighting event in Lachaqui, Peru. Crisis-displaced Iberian matadors including Nuno Casquinha and Emilo Serna are seeking fame in the rugged Andean backwaters of Peru. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Spanish Matadors Turn To Peru To Achieve Fame

Dozens of Spaniards bullfighters are struggling to gain fame in Latin America, something the economic crisis has made nearly impossible back home.

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