LIFESTYLE

Volcano Doctors Monitor Mexico's 'Popo'
Mexico's National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory keeps a round-the-clock watch on Popocatepetl, with technicians analyzing data for signs of a full-scale eruption.
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In this July 23, 2013 photo, Alberto Gonzalez of Mexicoâs National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory monitors the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico City. Cameras, computer screens and scrawling needles track the symptoms of a special patient, as they have every second of every day for the past two decades. The monitors indicate that âDon Goyoâ is breathing normally, even as he spews hot rock, steam and ash. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
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In this July 23, 2013 photo, Moises Dominguez of Mexicos National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory shows equipment used to monitor the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico City. Technicians keep a round-the-clock watch on Popocatepetl, analyzing data for signs of a full-scale eruption, which they can never fully anticipate. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
(AP2013)

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In this July 23, 2013 photo, Gilberto Castelan, director of instrumentation at Mexicos National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory, shows a seismic graph from Dec. 18, 2000 when a large eruption was recorded at the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico City. Sensors feed data to the constantly scrolling seismographs as the crew and volcanologists analyze the concentration of gases and changes in the shape of the mountain. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
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FILE - In this April 21, 2012 file photo, lights illuminate the Mexican town of Xalitzintla as the looming Popocatepetl volcano spews ash and steam during an early morning eruption. One of Popocatepetl's nicknames is Don Goyo, the nickname for Gregory, a character who supposedly was the spirit of the volcano and would come to warn the locals of eruptions or to assure them that the mountain, despite plumes of smoke, was calm. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)

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FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file photo provided by the Mexican Navy (SEMAR), steam and ash rise from the crater of the Popocatepetl volcano seen from the cockpit of an aircraft on the outskirts of Mexico City as pilots approach the volcano. At times the only way to really see whats going on inside is to fly over the crater, something Mexican officials do regularly, feeding Mexicos National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory more data. (AP Photo/SEMAR)

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In this July 23, 2013 photo, Gilberto Castelan, technical director at Mexicos National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory, shows an archive image of Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico City. The volcano is like a patient, and we observe the different aspects, said Castelan. Here we receive over 60 indicators in real time. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
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FILE - In this July 8, 2013 file photo, a stage 3 Yellow flag flies in the Paso de Cortes area near Popocatepetl volcano, behind left, in Mexico. The biggest danger for those nearby the volcano are mudslides and swift-moving clouds of gas. For those farther away, its the ash, which can ruin motors, stall airplanes, cover roofs with material heavy enough to make buildings collapse and cause respiratory diseases. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)

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FILE - In this May 7, 2013 file photo, cars dusted with volcanic ash from the Popocatepetl volcano sit parked in a casino parking lot in Puebla, Mexico. The biggest danger for those nearby the volcano are mudslides and swift-moving clouds of gas. For those farther away, its the ash, which can ruin motors, stall airplanes, cover roofs with material heavy enough to make buildings collapse and cause respiratory diseases. (AP Photo/Joel Merino, File)
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FILE - In this July 9, 2013 file photo, the church in the town of San Damian Texoloc, Mexico stands near Popocatepetl volcano spewing ash and vapor. Mexicos disaster prevention center says Popocatepetl has been active for at least 500,000 years. The biggest danger for those nearby are mudslides and swift-moving clouds of gas. (AP Photo/J. Guadalupe Perez, File)
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FILE - In this July 23, 2013 file photo, smoke rising from the crater of the Popocatepetl volcano is carried away by wind, next to dormant Iztaccihuatl volcano, front right, seen from a Mexican Navy aircraft on a volcano monitoring mission in Mexico. According to Mexican legend, Popocatepetl was a warrior who sought the hand of Iztaccihuatl, a fair maiden whose reluctant father told her that her suitor had died in battle. The Romeo and Juliet-style tale ends with the lovers turning into twin mountains east of Mexico City. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills, File)
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FILE - In this July 23, 2013 file photo, smoke rises from the crater of the Popocatepetl volcano as seen from a Mexican Navy aircraft on a volcano monitoring mission in Mexico. The Popocatepetl, or Smoking Mountain in the Nahuatl language, is a stratovolcano, a steep conical formation built from layers of thick, slow-moving lava and ash. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills, File)
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The Iztaccihuatl volcano is photographed from a Mexican Navy aircraft on a volcano monitoring mission in Mexico, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. The Iztaccihuatl is a dormant volcano situated in Central Mexico. As seen from Mexico City, the snow covered peaks resemble the head, breast and feet of a woman lying down, thus the popular designation of the volcano as the sleeping woman. Iztaccíhuatl last erupted in 1868. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
(AP2013)

Volcano Doctors Monitor Mexico's 'Popo'

Mexico's National Disaster Prevention Center laboratory keeps a round-the-clock watch on Popocatepetl, with technicians analyzing data for signs of a full-scale eruption.

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