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New Shipwrecks Found In Gulf Of Mexico
Little is known about the ships, including the flag or flags they sailed under and the year they sank about 170 miles southeast of Galveston. 
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This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows oxidized copper hull sheathing and possible draft marks visible on the bow of a wrecked ship in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas. Officials with Texas A&M University at Galveston and Texas State University say the recovery expedition of the two-masted ship that may be 200-years-old, concluded Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Theyve been able to recover some items like ceramics and bottles, including liquor bottles, and an octant, a navigational tool. Other items spotted among the wreckage are muskets, swords, cannons and clothing. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
(AP2012)

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This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows an anemone living on top of a musket that lies across other muskets at the site of a shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles from Galveston, Texas. Officials with Texas A&M University at Galveston and Texas State University say the recovery expedition of the two-masted ship concluded Wednesday, July 24, 2013. It may have sunk in the Gulf of Mexico 200 years ago. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
(AP2012)

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This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows the Little Hercules remotely operated vehicle and an anchor inside the hull of a copper-sheathed shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 miles off Galveston, Texas. Officials with Texas A&M University at Galveston and Texas State University say the recovery expedition of the two-masted ship concluded Wednesday. Items discovered aboard the vessel include muskets, swords, cannons and clothing. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
(AP2012)

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Texas Historical Commission State marine archeologist Amy Borgens, left, and co-scientist Frank Cantelas, right, load artifacts after sailing approximately 170 miles off Galveston to investigate a shipwreck on the Nautilus, Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Galveston. Marine archaeologists are excited about the discovery of what may be a well-preserved 200-year-old shipwreck more than three-quarters of a mile below the Gulf of Mexico. Investigators used the remote operating vehicle, Hercules, during their exploration. The crew brought back about 60 artifacts and plan to determine the ship's origin from studying the artifacts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Cody Duty)
(2013 HOUSTON CHRONICLE2013)

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Principal investigator Fritz Hanselmann of the Texas State University Meadows Center for Water and the Environment walks in front of the Hercules after the Nautilus returned from an approximately 170-mile trip off Galveston, Texas from investigating a shipwreck, Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Galveston. Marine archaeologists are excited about the discovery of what may be a well-preserved 200-year-old shipwreck more than three-quarters of a mile below the Gulf of Mexico. Investigators used the remote operating vehicle, Hercules, during their exploration. The crew brought back about 60 artifacts and plan to determine the ship's origin from studying the artifacts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Cody Duty)
(2013 HOUSTON CHRONICLE2013)

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From left, Mike Filimon, principal investigator Fritz Hanselmann, Stephen Estrin and Peter Way talk in front of the Hercules remote undersea vehicle, after the Nautilus returned from an approximately 170-trip off Galveston from investigating a shipwreck, Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Galveston. Marine archaeologists are excited about the discovery of what may be a well-preserved 200-year-old shipwreck more than three-quarters of a mile below the Gulf of Mexico. Investigators used the remote operating vehicle, Hercules, during their exploration. The crew brought back about 60 artifacts and plan to determine the ship's origin from studying the artifacts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Cody Duty)
(2013 HOUSTON CHRONICLE2013)

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Dr. Steve Gittings looks at a sea anemone after a crew sailed approximately 170 miles off Galveston to investigate a shipwreck on the Nautilus, Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Galveston. Marine archaeologists are excited about the discovery of what may be a well-preserved 200-year-old shipwreck more than three-quarters of a mile below the Gulf of Mexico. The crew brought back about 60 artifacts and plan to determine the ship's origin from studying the artifacts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Cody Duty)
(2013 HOUSTON CHRONICLE2013)

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This photo provided by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows a variety of artifacts including ceramic plates, platters, bowls plus glass liquor, wine, medicine, and food storage bottles of many shapes and colors found inside a wrecked ship's hull, in the Gulf of Mexico about 170 from Galveston, Texas. It may have sunk in the Gulf of Mexico 200 years ago. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
(AP2012)

New Shipwrecks Found In Gulf Of Mexico

Little is known about the ships, including the flag or flags they sailed under and the year they sank about 170 miles southeast of Galveston. 

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