LIFESTYLE

From Drug Den To Vital Highway In Mexico
The Durango-Mazatlan Highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone.
">

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_Sala

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 11, 2013 photo shows an aerial view of the recently completed cable-stayed bridge called the Baluarte in the western Sierra Madre near Concordia, Mexico. The Durango-Mazatlan Highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
(AP2013)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_5

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 11, 2013 photo shows an upward looking view of the recently completed bridge called the Baluarte in the western Sierra Madre near Concordia, Mexico. Communal tree farmers say that the federal government hasn't paid them sufficiently for access to their property during the construction and hasnt repaired the damage caused to pine forests, water supplies and endangered species habitat. The farmers have an injunction suspending construction near the bridge while a court considers their case. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_6

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 12, 2013 photo, a child playfully hangs from the bar of a tortilla store in the town of El Palmito, Mexico, along the old Durango-Mazatlan highway. A new highway is being built, and it remains to be seen if it will pull the towns in rural Sinaloa and Durango away from their historical ties to drug trafficking. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_7

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 12, 2013 photo, a man takes a photo of the landscape as he stands on the old Durango-Mazatlan highway, also known as the Espinazo del Diablo, or Devli's Backbone near the town of El Palmito, Mexico. Sinaloa state tourism officials predict an explosion for the resort city of Mazatlan, hard hit by drug violence in recent years, as the new road gives Mexicans in interior states an easy drive to the beach. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_8

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 11, 2013 photo, workers and residents stand on the recently completed stay-cable bridge called the Baluarte in the western Sierra Madre near Concordia, Mexico. The new highway will cut the drive between Durango and Mazatlan to 2.5 hours from the current six hours of hairpin turns, few guard rails and the Devil's Backbone, a stretch of road along the spine of a mountain with several-hundred-foot drops on either side. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_9

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 12, 2013 photo, a youth rides his bicycle in the town of El Palmito, Mexico, located along the old Durango-Mazatlan highway. Government officials say a new highway will bring legitimate economy to a troubled area. Locals say it may improve access, or take what little honest business they had as trucks and buses bypass towns altogether. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_10

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 11, 2013 photo, Sinaloa state secretary of Tourism Francisco Cordova looks out at the bridge called the Baluarte while flying in a helicopter near Concordia, Mexico where the new Durango-Mazatlan highway is being built. It will change the landscape of this part of the country, said Tourism Secretary Francisco Cordova. It's an opportunity to develop these areas and diversify the local economy. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_12

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 11, 2013 photo, shows an aerial view of a section of the Durango-Mazatlan highway in the western Sierra Madre near Concordia, Mexico. The highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_13

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 11, 2013 photo, workers walk inside one of the many tunnels that comprise the new Durango-Mazatlan highway near Concordia, Mexico. The Durango-Mazatlan Highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_14

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 11, 2013 photo, workers stand at the recently completed bridge called the Baluarte near Concordia, Mexico. A new Durango-Mazatlan highway will pass through colonial Concordia, founded in 1565 by the Spaniards as a way station between the coast and the gold mines. Government officials say the new road will bring legitimate economy to a troubled area. Locals say it may improve access, or take what little honest business they had as trucks and buses bypass towns altogether. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_15

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 12, 2013 photo, shows a view of the western Sierra Madre as seen from a lookout in the old Durango-Mazatlan road also known as the Espinazo del Diablo, or Devil's Backbonke neat the town of El Palmito, Mexico. Government officials say the new highway will bring legitimate economy to a troubled area. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_16

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 11, 2013 photo shows an aerial view of the recently completed bridge called the Baluarte near Concordia, Mexico. The Durango-Mazatlan Highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
(AP2013)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_17

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - This June 11, 2013 photo, shows an aerial view of vacation homes and a golf course in the Pacific resort city of Mazatlan, Mexico. Sinaloa state tourism officials predict an explosion for the resort city of Mazatlan, hard hit by drug violence in recent years, as a new Durango-Mazatlan Highway gives Mexicans in interior states an easy drive to the beach. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_3

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 12, 2013 photo, a cargo truck whizzes past on the new Durango-Mazatlan Highway, also known as the Espinazo del Diablo, or the Devli's Backbone, near the town of El Palmito, Mexico. The highway, expected to be completed in August, will change northern Mexico dramatically, linking the port cities on the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific by a mere 12-hour drive. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

mexico_devils_backbone_18

Fotografía aérea del 11 de junio de 2013 que muesta el recién completado puente de tirantes más alto del mundo, llamado Baluarte, sobre un desfiladero de 400 metros (1.200 pies), en la Sierra Madre Occidental, cerca de Concordia, México. La carretera Durango-Mazatlán es una de las obras de ingeniería más notables de México e incluirá 115 puentes y 61 túneles a ser usados para transportar gente, cargamentos y mercaderías legítimas a través de una cadena de montañas conocida por la marihuana, amapolas que producen opio y una ruta donde abundan los accidentes llamada Espinazo del Diablo. (Foto AP/Darío López-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_2

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 12, 2013 photo, a preacher and a beggar stand on the old Durango-Mazatlan road, at the entrance to the town of Concordia, Mexico. A new Durango-Mazatlan highway will pass through colonial Concordia, founded in 1565 by the Spaniards as a way station between the coast and the gold mines. Government officials say the new road will bring legitimate economy to a troubled area. Locals say it may improve access, or take what little honest business they had as trucks and buses bypass towns altogether.(AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexico_Devils_Backbon_4

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AND THEREAFTER - In this June 11, 2013 photo, a worker crosses the median on the recently completed cable-stayed bridge called the Baluarte in the western Sierra Madre near Concordia, Mexico. Sinaloa state tourism officials predict an explosion for the resort city of Mazatlan, hard hit by drug violence in recent years, as the new road gives Mexicans in interior states an easy drive to the beach. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

From Drug Den To Vital Highway In Mexico

The Durango-Mazatlan Highway vies to be one of Mexico's greatest engineering feats, designed to bring people, cargo and legitimate commerce safely through a mountain range known until now for marijuana, opium poppies and an accident-prone road called the Devil's Backbone.

More From Our Sponsors