LIFESTYLE

Chile's Indigenous Fight Gold Miners To Protect Land
River levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and indigenous Chileans now complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs.
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In this May 23, 2013, grape grower Pascual Abalos Godoy, 73, returns from the field in El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama mining project in northern Chile. Abalos Godoy says he suffers from an eye inflammation similar to an allergic reaction, blaming his health problem on contamination caused by the mining project. Since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and complain of health problems including cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, Juan Guerrero rides past a wall of rock as he rides into El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, mostly from the Diaguita ethnic group, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The Diaguitas live in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember theyve drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. But since Barrick gold mine project moved in, the residents claim the river levels have dropped and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, two men walk along a road in El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, mostly from the Diaguita ethnic group, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The Diaguitas live in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember theyve drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. But since Pascua-Lama gold mine project moved in, the Diaguitas claim the river levels have dropped and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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This May 23, 2013 photo, shows El Corral, a village of 200 inhabitants, mostly from the Diaguita ethnic group, located just downstream from the worlds highest gold mine, Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The Diaguitas live in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember theyve drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. But since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in some places and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, El Corral village leader Yovana Paredes gathers herbs along the banks of the Estrecho River, where for as long as anyone can remember residents have drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water, located near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. But since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, barrels labeled hazardous waste are seen at the Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project facilities in northern Chile. Chiles newly empowered environmental regulator confirmed nearly two-dozen violations of Barricks environmental impact agreement on Friday, May 24, 2013, blocking all other construction on the $8.5 billion project until the Canadian company keeps its promises to prevent water contamination. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
(AP2013)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, a cross that bears the message; "No to Barrick" is posted outside a home in El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, mostly from the Diaguita ethnic group, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The Diaguitas live in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember theyve drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. But since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, a dog who suffers from an eye inflammation, looks into the camera in El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama mining project in northern Chile. Residents blame the dog's eye inflammation on contamination caused by the Barrick gold mining project. Since the project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and complain of health problems including cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, a water tank displays a message that reads; "No Pascua-Lama" in El Corral, a small town of about 200 inhabitants, mostly from the Diaguita ethnic group, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The Diaguitas live in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember theyve drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. But since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped and some complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, security officers walk away from the entrance of the Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama facilities, in northern Chile. Chile's environmental regulator blocked Barrick Gold Corp.'s $8.5 billion Pascua-Lama project on Friday, May 24, 2013, and imposed its maximum fine on the world's largest gold miner, citing "very serious" violations of its environmental permit as well as a failure by the company to accurately describe what it had done wrong. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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This May 23, 2013 photo, shows lettering that reads in Spanish; "This is my family," above an effigy of a worker, at the entrance of the Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project facilites in northern Chile. Chiles newly empowered environmental regulator confirmed nearly two-dozen violations of Barricks environmental impact agreement on Friday, May 24, 2013, blocking all other construction on the $8.5 billion project until the Canadian company keeps its promises to prevent water contamination. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, Martina Lopez cooks bread in her home in El Corral, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama mining project in northern Chile. Chile's environmental regulator blocked Barrick Gold Corp.'s $8.5 billion Pascua-Lama project on Friday, May 24, 2013, and imposed its maximum fine on the world's largest gold miner, citing "very serious" violations of its environmental permit as well as a failure by the company to accurately describe what it had done wrong. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, mining trucks sit parked on the facilities at the Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project facilities in northern Chile. Chiles newly empowered environmental regulator confirmed nearly two-dozen violations of Barricks environmental impact agreement on Friday, May 24, 2013, blocking all other construction on the $8.5 billion project until the Canadian company keeps its promises to prevent water contamination. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
(AP2013)

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In this May 23, 2014 photo, a chicken carcass lies on top of a tank found by grape grower Pascual Abalos Godoy on his morning rounds, who believes the chicken died from drinking contaminated water, in El Corral, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The residents living in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember, have drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. Since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and complain of health problems including cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

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In this May 23, 2013, farmer Danilo Enrique De La Torre Isandon speaks during an interview, in El Corral, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. De La Torre blames Barrick for the lack of water he needs to grow grass to sustain his animals. Chile's environmental regulator blocked Barrick Gold Corp.'s $8.5 billion Pascua-Lama project on Friday, May 24, 2013, and imposed its maximum fine on the world's largest gold miner, citing "very serious" violations of its environmental permit as well as a failure by the company to accurately describe what it had done wrong. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
(AP2013)

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In this May 23, 2013 photo, El Corral village leader Yovana Paredes, 40, and a neighbor look over at chicken carcass found by their neighbor on his morning rounds, who believes the chicken died from drinking contaminated water, in El Corral, near the facilities of Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project in northern Chile. The residents living in the foothills of the Andes, where for as long as anyone can remember, have drunk straight from the glacier-fed river that irrigates their orchards and vineyards with clean water. Since the Barrick gold mine project moved in, residents claim the river levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and complain of health problems including cancerous growths and aching stomachs. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

Chile's Indigenous Fight Gold Miners To Protect Land

River levels have dropped, the water is murky in places and indigenous Chileans now complain of cancerous growths and aching stomachs.

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