LIFESTYLE

Borgo: The Small Town in a Big City
From shoe resoling to risotto tasting, and from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes.  
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People walk past a fountain in Borgo Pio, near the Vatican, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Borgo, the sleepy, medieval neighborhood with a timeless feel right outside the Vatican's borders, has been at the service of pontiffs for centuries. From resoling to risotto, from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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This photo provided by the Italian Police press office shows an aerial view of Saint Peter's Square prior to the start of the installation Mass of Pope Francis at the Vatican, Tuesday, March 19, 2013.
(AP)

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Antonio Arellano stands next to a copy of a pair of shoes he made for Pope Benedict XVI, in his shoemaker shop, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Borgo, the sleepy, medieval neighborhood with a timeless feel right outside the Vatican's borders, has been at the service of pontiffs for centuries. From resoling to risotto, from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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Pictures of Pope Benedict XVI are displayed for sale inside a shop in Rome's Borgo Pio, near the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Last week, 85-year-old Benedict shocked the world by announcing his resignation. He will step down on Feb. 28, planning to retreat to a life of prayer in a monastery behind the Vatican's ancient walls. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

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Antonio Arellano works in his shoe repair and shoemaker shop, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Borgo, the sleepy, medieval neighborhood with a timeless feel right outside the Vatican's borders, has been at the service of pontiffs for centuries. From resoling to risotto, from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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A nun exits shoemaker, left, Antonio Arellano's shop, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Borgo, the sleepy, medieval neighborhood with a timeless feel right outside the Vatican's borders, has been at the service of pontiffs for centuries. From resoling to risotto, from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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FILE - In this March 4, 2013 file photo, papal shoes and a white skull cap are seen beneath three sets of papal outfits - small, medium and large sizes - are displayed in the Gammarelli tailor shop window, in Rome. The favorite guessing game in Rome these days is who will be the next pope. No one takes this more seriously than the Gammarelli family, ecclesiastical tailors by papal appointment for over 200 years. For the past seven conclaves Gammarelli has prepared three identical white outfits in small, medium and large for the new pope when he makes his first public appearance on the balcony of St.Peter's and gives his first blessing to the crowd below. The outfits have been on display in the window of the small wood paneled store nestled in the shadow of the Pantheon, where the family moved in 1850 from the original "bottega'' (artisan shop) just around the corner founded in 1798. Before the start of the conclave, the outfits will be delivered to the Vatican, and left in a room adjacent to the Sistine Chapel, where the just elected pope will change into his new clothes. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Files)

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A woman walks past pictures of Pope Benedict XVI displayed outside a shop selling religious items in Rome's Borgo Pio, near the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Last week, 85-year-old Benedict shocked the world by announcing his resignation. He will step down on Feb. 28, planning to retreat to a life of prayer in a monastery behind the Vatican's ancient walls. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

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Restaurant owner Patrizia Podetti, center, serves dishes in her Velando restaurant, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Velando is a favorite dining spot for churchmen, with sleek wooden furnishings, subdued lighting and vaulted, whitewashed ceiling giving an air of a church sacristy. Joseph Ratzinger, recently retired Pope Benedict XVI, often dined there before becoming pope. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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Restaurant owner Patrizia Podetti, center, serves dishes in her Velando restaurant, in Rome, Monday, March 18, 2013. Velando is a favorite dining spot for churchmen, with sleek wooden furnishings, subdued lighting and vaulted, whitewashed ceiling giving an air of a church sacristy. Joseph Ratzinger, recently retired Pope Benedict XVI, often dined there before becoming pope. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Borgo: The Small Town in a Big City

From shoe resoling to risotto tasting, and from light bulbs to linguine, Borgo is the go-to place for up-and-coming cardinals and sometimes even for popes.  

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