LIFESTYLE

Colombia's Orphaned Monkey Finds a Mom
Martha Silva mothers a tiny night monkey as if it was her own child. 
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A 15-day-old night monkey sits in a veterinarian's palm at a temporary shelter west of Bogota, Colombia, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Sponsored by Bogota's Ministry of Environment, the shelter receives between 3,000 and 3,500 wild animals a year; some seized from poachers and others found hurt. An estimated $560,000 U.S. dollars are spent in the recovery and care of these animals. Seventy percent of rescued animals are reintroduced to their habitat and the remaining 30% are sent to zoos around the country. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
(AP2013)

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Caretaker Marta Silva places a baby night monkey close to her chest after showing it to a news photographer at a wildlife shelter in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The tiny night monkey is with Silva 24 hours a day, nestled in a wool pouch inside her coat or beside her while she sleeps. Silva works with the neonatal unit of Bogota's Wildlife Reception Center, part of the capital's environment ministry, where she has nurtured species ranging from birds to turtles to primates. Now she is looking after the night monkey of the genus Aotus that lives in the tropical forests of South America, including Colombia, Brazil and Ecuador. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
(AP2013)

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Caretaker Marta Silva, right, and biologist Judith Cardenas look at a baby night monkey at a wildlife shelter in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. Silva works with the neonatal unit of Bogota's Wildlife Reception Center, part of the capital's environment ministry, where she has nurtured species ranging from birds to turtles to primates. Now she is looking after the night monkey of the genus Aotus that lives in the tropical forests of South America, including Colombia, Brazil and Ecuador. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

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A 15-day-old night monkey is fed at a temporary shelter west of Bogota, Colombia, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. The male night monkey arrived at the center on Feb. 4, weighing a scant 100 grams, or about one-quarter of a pound. It was brought by a man who said he found it abandoned on the side of a highway in Colombia's eastern plains near Meta province, said Judith Cardenas, the center's chief biologist. The plan, according to Cardenas, is to let the baby monkey grow and then place him in a large cage in the center, next to another monkey of the same species. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

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A 15-day-old night monkey clutches the fingers of a veterinarian at a temporary shelter west of Bogota, Colombia, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Sponsored by Bogota's Ministry of Environment, the shelter receives between 3,000 and 3,500 wild animals a year; some seized from poachers and others found hurt. An estimated $560,000 U.S. dollars are spent in the recovery and care of these animals. Seventy percent of rescued animals are reintroduced to their habitat and the remaining 30% are sent to zoos around the country. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
(AP2013)

Colombia's Orphaned Monkey Finds a Mom

Martha Silva mothers a tiny night monkey as if it was her own child. 

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