LIFESTYLE

Pet Therapists to the Rescue
When pets in Argentina seem out of sorts, pet owners have plenty of therapists to visit to attempt an emotional rescue.
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(Marcelo Lombardi)

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Dr. Ricardo Bruno, a self-proclaimed “old socialist” and a soccer fan, says that when he started his practice, it literally didn’t exist in Latin America.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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The turning point for pet therapy came in the 1990s, when major TV networks like Discovery Channel, Nat Geo and others came out with shows that revealed a new way to care for animals – a more tender way. 

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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“The main problem in urban life is that sometimes there is a lack of affection. Animals have to carry this heavy weight on their backs...  And dogs and cats have serious anxiety problems that don’t get addressed,” says Dr. Ricardo Bruno.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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Animals, ethology enthusiasts believe, a lot of times need more than medicine to make them better. Sometimes they just need some love.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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Dr. Ricardo Bruno, a 53-year-old veterinarian based in Buenos Aires, the Argentinean capital, is one of the country pioneers in a practice known as ethology, a growing field that differs from veterinary medicine in that it explores animal behavior rather than clinical issues.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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Dr. Ricardo Bruno, a 53-year-old veterinarian based in Buenos Aires, the Argentinean capital, is one of the country pioneers in a practice known as ethology, a growing field that differs from veterinary medicine in that it explores animal behavior rather than clinical issues.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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(Marcelo Lombardi)

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“Rich people, poor people, young, old, homosexual, heterosexual, everyone comes. When I started practicing ethology 10 years ago, this branch of science didn’t exist officially. I became interested because I had a cat that seemed crazy, until I saw that the way we treated her could be affecting her behavior,” said Dr. Silvia Vai, an ethologist.

(Marcelo Lombardi)

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“Rich people, poor people, young, old, homosexual, heterosexual, everyone comes,” she says. “When I started practicing ethology 10 years ago, this branch of science didn’t exist officially. I became interested because I had a cat that seemed crazy, until I saw that the way we treated her could be affecting her behavior,”  says Dr. Silvia Vai

(Marcelo Lombardi)

Pet Therapists to the Rescue

When pets in Argentina seem out of sorts, pet owners have plenty of therapists to visit to attempt an emotional rescue.

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