LIFESTYLE

Puerto Rico Prepped for Invasion of Caimans
Floods heralded the arrival of caimans, a close relative of the alligator, whose population has exploded in and around the lagoon next to Los Naranjos neighborhood in the coastal city of Vega Baja.
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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Daniel Montanez, 58, uses a pole to hold up a caiman crocodile at his home in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. A fisherman by trade, Montanez said the caimans first caught his eye during night fishing expeditions. Now, neighbors call him if they have a problem with the reptiles. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Daniel Montanez, 58, holds a caiman in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. A fisherman by trade, Montanez said the caimans first caught his eye during night fishing expeditions. Now, neighbors call him if they have a problem with the reptiles. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Shalepxis Morales uses a razor to peel the skin of a recently killed caiman with the help of his grandfather Daniel Montanez in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. The Montanez family said the meat tastes like chicken as long as its marinated in lemon or orange juice to first take away the fishy taste. Then they fry it, sautee it or grill it. What the family doesnt eat is sold to interested buyers. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, caimans are kept in a holding tank in the backyard of the Montanez family home before being killed to sell for human consumption in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. Caimans are native to Central and South America, but were introduced to Puerto Rico by stores such as Woolworths that sold baby caimans the size of lizards as pets during the 1960s and 70s, Atienza said. When the caimans began to grow, people released them into the wild, where females rapidly reproduced, laying up to 40 eggs at a time. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Daniel Montanez, right, strips the skin of a caiman in his home's driveway with the help of his grandchildren Shalepxis Morales, left, and Shamil Morales in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. A fisherman by trade, Montanez said the caimans first caught his eye during night fishing expeditions. Now, neighbors call him if they have a problem with the reptiles. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Daniel Montanez, 58, uses a pole to control a caiman at his home in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. A fisherman by trade, Montanez said the caimans first caught his eye during night fishing expeditions. Now, neighbors call him if they have a problem with the reptiles. At left is Montanez' grandson Yamil Morales. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

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In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, a caiman is held by its neck with a pole in a holding tank at the home of Daniel Montanez in the Los Naranjos neighborhood of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. Caimans are native to Central and South America, but were introduced to Puerto Rico by stores such as Woolworth√Ęs that sold baby caimans the size of lizards as pets during the 1960s and 70s, Atienza said. When the caimans began to grow, people released them into the wild, where females rapidly reproduced, laying up to 40 eggs at a time. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
(AP2012)

Puerto Rico Prepped for Invasion of Caimans

Floods heralded the arrival of caimans, a close relative of the alligator, whose population has exploded in and around the lagoon next to Los Naranjos neighborhood in the coastal city of Vega Baja.

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