LIFESTYLE

Graffiti Artist Battles Violence in Honduras
In one of the most deadly cities in the world, a graffiti artist is using his work to protest the violence.
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In this July 29, 2012 photo, a masked artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, walks away after pasting one of his "interventions" on a street wall showing Rene Magritte's "Son of Man," substituting the apple covering the face of the suited subject in bowler hat with a pink grenade, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The 26-year-old graphic artist left his day job at an advertising agency to work on pieces like this one, to encourage Hondurans think about how violent their country has become. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

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In this July 29, 2012 photo, a masked artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, adjusts his mask and sunglasses in his studio before going out to paste his "interventions" on street walls in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The 26-year-old graphic artist left his day job at an advertising agency to create pieces to exhibit in public places that encourage Hondurans think about how violent their country has become. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

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In this July 29, 2012 photo, a masked artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, quickly pastes an image of a bookshelf that reads in Spanish "Take one, they're free" on a telephone switch box in the street in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The artist's canvas is the streets of the Central American city which he describes as "captive, fearful and closed by a mixture of violence, poverty and an absence of public services. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

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In this July 29, 2012 photo, an artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, works on a reproduction of Rene Magritte's "Son of Man," substituting the apple covering the face of the suited subject in a bowler hat with a pink grenade, at his studio in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The 26-year-old graphic artist left his day job at an advertising agency to work on pieces like this one, to encourage Hondurans think about how violent their country has become. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

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In this July 29, 2012 photo, an artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, works on a black-and-white reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" holding a pink gun at his studio before hanging it in a public space in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The 26-year-old graphic artist left his day job at an advertising agency to work on pieces like this one, to encourage Hondurans think about how violent their country has become. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

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In this July 29, 2012 photo, an artist who calls himself the Urban Maeztro and prefers to remain anonymous for security reasons, paints a bullet on a slanted street light pole in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The 26-year-old graphic artist left his day job at an advertising agency to create pieces like this one, to encourage Hondurans think about how violent their country has become. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
(AP2012)

Graffiti Artist Battles Violence in Honduras

In one of the most deadly cities in the world, a graffiti artist is using his work to protest the violence.

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