LIFESTYLE

Bolivians Take Skulls to Cemetery
Believers keep skulls, called "natitas," in their homes, giving them names and keeping them in glass cases or on makeshift altars.
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Bolivia_Skulls_3

A woman holds a set of decorated human skulls during Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls festivities, before the start of a Mass at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_5

Catholic faithful leave the church cemetery carrying their decorated human skulls after attending a Mass during the Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls festivities in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not officially recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_1

A man carries a decorated human skull before the start of a Mass celebrating Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls, at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not officially recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_2

A woman holds a trio of decorated human skulls during Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls festivities, before the start of a Mass at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_4

A woman carries a decorated human skull the start of a Mass celebrating Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls, at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not officially recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_6

Catholic faithful with their decorated human skulls in hand wait for the start of a Mass celebrating Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls, at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not officially recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_8

Catholic faithful carry decorated human skulls during the Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls, festivities, before the start of a Mass at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the Catholic All Saints holiday, but is not recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_9

A man carries a set of decorated human skulls during Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls festivities, before the start of a Mass at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivia_Skulls_7

Catholic faithful with their decorated human skulls in hand wait for the start of a Mass celebrating Dia de los Natitas or Day of the Skulls, at the church cemetery in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. "Natitas," are human skulls from unnamed, abandoned graves or departed loved ones, that when cared for and decorated with flowers, cigarettes, coca leaves among other treats, are believed to protect one from evil. The Bolivian ritual marks the end of the All Saints holiday, but is not officially recognized by the Catholic church. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
(AP2011)

Bolivians Take Skulls to Cemetery

Believers keep skulls, called "natitas," in their homes, giving them names and keeping them in glass cases or on makeshift altars.

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